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Weekly Program List for RadioClassics

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Time Zone
Wednesday 11/22
12:00 am – 12:30 am Big Town
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"Dangerous Cargo" from 5/7/1942 Edward G. Robinson starred as crusading newspaper editor Steve Wilson from October 19, 1937 through July 2, 1942. The Hollywood great was glad to play an idealistic role in contrast to his many film gangster portrayals. Big Town at its peak was radio’s highest-rated drama and was only eclipsed by The Jack Benny Program in ratings. The series was canceled when Edward G. Robinson quit in 1942 but was resurrected the following year with Edward Pawley (and later Walter Greaza) as Wilson and Fran Carlon as Lorelei. The revived Big Town aired from October 5, 1943 through June 25, 1952.

12:30 am – 1:00 am Gangbusters
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"Case Of Date With Death" from 6/4/1949 Gangbusters first came to radio under the title G-Men beginning July 20, 1935. The long-running series was created by Philip H. Lord and produced "in cooperation with police and federal law enforcement departments throughout the U.S. Gangbusters was one of radio's longest-running dramatic series, running from January 15, 1936 through November 27, 1957, and its classic opening gave rise to the expression "coming on like gangbusters."

1:00 am – 1:30 am The Falcon
close The Falcon

"Case Of The Talented Twins" from 10/1/1950 Michael Waring was a freelance detective who was also known as the Falcon. Waring's detective techniques were a cross between Ellery Queen and Richard Diamond. He had a certain eye for detail but was frequently on the outs with the police.

1:30 am – 2:00 am The Hermit's Cave
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"House Of Murder" from 1940s This horror series aired in multiple iterations from 1930-1944. It consisted of standalone tales told by "The Hermit," a mysterious, cackling storyteller. It was first broadcast on a Detroit radio station before moving to Los Angeles, where the show would be produced by William Conrad (creator and voice of Gunsmoke's Marshall Matt Dillon)

2:00 am – 2:30 am Frontier Gentleman
close Frontier Gentleman

"Belljoy's Prisoner" from 6/8/1958 This excellent Western series, created by Antony Ellis, aired for several months on CBS in 1958. John Dehner starred as British reporter J.B. Kendall, who traveled the Wild West in search of stories of adventure. Versatile radio stars like Virginia Gregg, Jospeh Kearns, Stacy Harris and more were featured throughout.

2:30 am – 3:30 am The Whistler
close The Whistler

"Lady With A Knife" from 12/3/1950 "High Death" from 3/11/1951 The Whistler whistled its way onto the airwaves beginning May 16, 1942 and its eerie 13-note theme set the tone for West Coast radio mystery for the next decade. "I am the Whistler and I know many things, for I walk by night. I know many strange tales hidden in the hearts of men and women who have stepped into the shadows. Yes, I know the nameless terrors of which they dare not speak."

3:30 am – 4:00 am Suspense
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"Stool Pigeon" from 9/20/1955 Suspense debuted on June 17, 1942 as a sustaining summer replacement, returned that fall and continued in the CBS lineup until September 30, 1962. "Radio's outstanding theatre of thrills" is recognized as one of the finest dramatic series in the history of broadcasting.

4:00 am – 4:30 am Alan Young Show
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"Cowboy Blood" from 5/23/1947 This sitcom aired from 1944-1949, first as a summer replacement series for Eddie Cantor's show. Then, after signing on as a regular on the Jimmy Durante show, young scored his own show with Tums as a sponsor. Today he is best known as TV's Wilbur Post, who talked with Mr. Ed the horse.

4:30 am – 5:00 am Radio Classics Special Interviews
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Alan Young & Greg Bell Part 1

5:00 am – 5:30 am Hollywood Star Playhouse
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"No Gloom Of Night" from 4/27/1952

5:30 am – 6:00 am Radio Classics Special Interviews
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Alan Young & Greg Bell Part 2

6:00 am – 7:00 am Suspense
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"The Kandy Tooth" from 1/11/1948 Suspense debuted on June 17, 1942 as a sustaining summer replacement, returned that fall and continued in the CBS lineup until September 30, 1962. "Radio's outstanding theatre of thrills" is recognized as one of the finest dramatic series in the history of broadcasting.

7:00 am – 7:30 am The Whistler
close The Whistler

"The Choice" from 1/13/1947 The Whistler whistled its way onto the airwaves beginning May 16, 1942 and its eerie 13-note theme set the tone for West Coast radio mystery for the next decade. "I am the Whistler and I know many things, for I walk by night. I know many strange tales hidden in the hearts of men and women who have stepped into the shadows. Yes, I know the nameless terrors of which they dare not speak."

7:30 am – 8:00 am Frontier Fighters
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"Dr. John McLoughlin" from 1935 This series consisted of episodes about true historical adventures in the American West. Some of the stories include Lewis & Clark, the Oregon boundary dispute, and the purchase of Alaska. The original broadcast dates for Frontier Fighters are still unclear; the series ran sometime during the 1930s.

8:00 am – 8:30 am Pete Kelly's Blues
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"Zelda" from 8/29/1951 Radio Classics invites you to experience the audio magic of legendary old time radio. RadioClassics features the best dramas, mysteries, comedies, and variety programs from the Golden Age of Radio.

8:30 am – 9:00 am Yours Truly, Johnny Dollar
close Yours Truly, Johnny Dollar

"Eleven O'Clock Matter" from 1/19/1958 Yours Truly, Johnny Dollar told the story of the freelance insurance investigator with the "action-packed expense account." Radio’s last great detective series, Yours Truly, Johnny Dollar ended its run September 30, 1962 during the final week of network radio drama.

9:00 am – 9:30 am Fibber McGee & Molly
close Fibber McGee & Molly

"Dining Out" from 1/25/1944 The husband-and-wife vaudeville team of Jim and Marian Jordan began their radio careers in Peoria on a bet from Jim’s brother. The Jordans were heard as The O’Henry Twins and The Air Scouts before Don Quinn created Smackout in 1931. Quinn revamped the show as Fibber McGee and Molly in 1935 when Johnson’s Wax signed on as sponsor.

9:30 am – 10:00 am Honest Harold
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"Falling For A Chanteuse" from 10/11/1950 KA "The Harold Peary Show" -- Peary, best known for his role as Gildersleeve on the Fibber McGee & Molly Show (and later on The Great Gildserleeve), starred in this short-lived sitcom. After acting as Gildersleeve on NBC for more than 10 years, Peary switched to CBS for this series, which only ran for one season. However, during the show's run, then-governor Earl Warren awarded Peary for his 10,000th radio broadcast (Warren later became Chief Justice of the US Supreme Court)

10:00 am – 10:30 am Dr. Kildare
close Dr. Kildare

"Eddie Jenkins & The Arsonist" from 10/20/1950 This medical drama was based on films by the same name. Lews Ayes as Dr. Kildare and Lionel Barrymore as Dr. Gillespie face everything from pushy administrators to personal drama and ethical crises in the halls of Blair General Hospital in New York City

10:30 am – 11:00 am Big Town
close Big Town

"Parole Board" from 11/30/19 Edward G. Robinson starred as crusading newspaper editor Steve Wilson from October 19, 1937 through July 2, 1942. The Hollywood great was glad to play an idealistic role in contrast to his many film gangster portrayals. Big Town at its peak was radio’s highest-rated drama and was only eclipsed by The Jack Benny Program in ratings. The series was canceled when Edward G. Robinson quit in 1942 but was resurrected the following year with Edward Pawley (and later Walter Greaza) as Wilson and Fran Carlon as Lorelei. The revived Big Town aired from October 5, 1943 through June 25, 1952.

11:00 am – 11:30 am Night Beat
close Night Beat

"Gunner's Last Flight" from 8/14/1950 Frank Lovejoy is heard as Randy "Lucky" Stone, a hardboiled reporter who covers the "nightbeat" for the Chicago Star. Randy Stone wandered the back alleys and bars of Chicago, searching for both crime and human-interest stories. Nightbeat premiered on February 6, 1950 and ran until September 25, 1952.

11:30 am – 12:00 pm Suspense
close Suspense

"Vial Of Death" from 5/18/1953 Suspense debuted on June 17, 1942 as a sustaining summer replacement, returned that fall and continued in the CBS lineup until September 30, 1962. "Radio's outstanding theatre of thrills" is recognized as one of the finest dramatic series in the history of broadcasting.

12:00 pm – 1:00 pm When Radio Was
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Radio Spirits' nationally syndicated radio program hosted by old-time radio expert Greg Bell

1:00 pm – 1:30 pm Richard Diamond, Private Detective
close Richard Diamond, Private Detective

"Ralph Baxter Case" from 4/26/1950 Richard Diamond, Private Detective premiered over the NBC network on April 24, 1949 and ran through 1952 starring Dick Powell as "radio's singing detective." Powell had first achieved movie stardom as a baby-faced crooner, and later matured to hardboiled roles, including Raymond Chandler's Philip Marlowe in the 1944 film Murder My Sweet.

1:30 pm – 2:00 pm Gunsmoke
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"Hinka-Do" from 10/10/1952 Radio’s greatest adult western told the story of Matt Dillon, U.S. Marshal, "the first man they look for and the last they want to meet." Gunsmoke grew out of a request from CBS founder William Paley for a "Philip Marlowe in the Old West," and featured grimly realistic stories set in the vicinity of Dodge City, the "Gommorrah of the West," with William Conrad as Dillon.

2:00 pm – 3:00 pm Judy Canova Show
close Judy Canova Show

"Moves To Brentwood" from 12/27/1944 (Rehearsal) "Back From Rancho Canova Motel" from 2/29/1944 Judy Canova's career began in a family vaudeville group alongside her sister and brother. After several years of popular guest apperances and guest hosting gigs in the '30s and '40s, Judy Canova's own radio show debuted in 1943. The show ran for twelve years— first on CBS and then on NBC. She played an exagerrated version of herself, a country bumpkin transplanted in Hollywood.

3:00 pm – 3:30 pm Abbott and Costello Show
close Abbott and Costello Show

"Guest: Judy Canova" from 1/6/1944 Bud Abbott and Lou Costello made their radio debut on CBS’ The Kate Smith Show as replacements for Hollywood-bound Henny Youngman. The former burlesque comics reintroduced and preserved the classic comedy sketches of vaudeville in their films and radio and television series. The Abbott and Costello Show debuted as a 1940 summer replacement for Fred Allen and later aired from October 8, 1942 through June 29, 1949.

3:30 pm – 4:00 pm Our Miss Brooks
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"Sunnydale Finishing School" from 11/28/1948 Eve Arden portrays Miss Connie Brooks, an overworked and underpaid teacher of 10th grade English at Madison High School. Our Miss Brooks called her radio classroom to order beginning July 19, 1948. The final bell rang for Our Miss Brooks on July 7, 1957.

4:00 pm – 4:30 pm Adventures of Sam Spade
close Adventures of Sam Spade

"The Dry Martini Caper" 8/1/1948 Dashiell Hammett's Sam Spade walked out of the pages of Black Mask and into his own CBS radio series of July 12, 1946. Howard Duff starred as the hardboiled detective for the first three seasons. Lurene Tuttle was Sam's secretary Effie Perrine and Jerry Hausner was his lawyer Sid Weiss. CBS dropped the series in 1950 when Hammett ran afoul of Congress' Un-American Activities investigators, but the show was quickly revived by NBC.

4:30 pm – 5:00 pm The Whistler
close The Whistler

"Witness At The Fountain" from 9/9/1946 The Whistler whistled its way onto the airwaves beginning May 16, 1942 and its eerie 13-note theme set the tone for West Coast radio mystery for the next decade. "I am the Whistler and I know many things, for I walk by night. I know many strange tales hidden in the hearts of men and women who have stepped into the shadows. Yes, I know the nameless terrors of which they dare not speak."

5:00 pm – 5:30 pm Adventures of Sam Spade
close Adventures of Sam Spade

"Red Amapola Caper (Rehearsal)" from 5/21/1950 Dashiell Hammett's Sam Spade walked out of the pages of Black Mask and into his own CBS radio series of July 12, 1946. Howard Duff starred as the hardboiled detective for the first three seasons. Lurene Tuttle was Sam's secretary Effie Perrine and Jerry Hausner was his lawyer Sid Weiss. CBS dropped the series in 1950 when Hammett ran afoul of Congress' Un-American Activities investigators, but the show was quickly revived by NBC.

5:30 pm – 6:00 pm Suspense
close Suspense

"A Murderous Revision" from 12/3/1951 Suspense debuted on June 17, 1942 as a sustaining summer replacement, returned that fall and continued in the CBS lineup until September 30, 1962. "Radio's outstanding theatre of thrills" is recognized as one of the finest dramatic series in the history of broadcasting.

6:00 pm – 6:30 pm Inner Sanctum Mysteries
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"Corridor Of Doom" from 10/23/1945 Inner Sanctum's sinister host welcomed listeners "through the squeaking door to another night of horror." The show’s "squeaking door" was one of radio’s most-remembered openings and was inspired by the creaking hinges on a sound effects door at the radio studio.

6:30 pm – 7:00 pm Suspense
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"Drury's Bones" from 1/25/1945 Suspense debuted on June 17, 1942 as a sustaining summer replacement, returned that fall and continued in the CBS lineup until September 30, 1962. "Radio's outstanding theatre of thrills" is recognized as one of the finest dramatic series in the history of broadcasting.

7:00 pm – 8:00 pm Lights Out!
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"Meteor Man" from 12/22/1942 --- "Nature Study" from 6/22/1943 Lights Out debuted January 1, 1934 over Chicago’s WENR and moved onto the NBC airwaves beginning April 17, 1935. Radio’s premier horror series was created by writer/ director Wyllis Cooper. Cooper was succeeded by Arch Oboler, one of radio’s greatest dramatic talents.

8:00 pm – 8:30 pm Adventures of Harry Nile
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"Fool's Gold" from 4/13/2008 This series is one of a few modern series featured by Radio Classics. A creation of writer Jim French, Harry Nile first came to radio in 1976 and continued to be adapted into the late '90s as part of the "Imagination Theatre" productions. Harry Nile, a former Chicago cop turned private detective, was played by Phil Harper for more than 20 years.

8:30 pm – 9:00 pm The Line-Up
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"The Unexplained Murder" from 6/17/1952 This CBS cop procedural pulls back the curtain on crime fighting in San Francisco. The Shadow's Bill Johnstone starred as cool-mannered Lt. Ben Guthrie, foil to hot-tempered Sgt. Matt Grebb. Director Elliot Lewis was one of the busiest men in radio, having a hand in the Phil Harris & Alice Faye Show, Suspense, Broadway Is My Beat, and many more.

9:00 pm – 9:30 pm Gunsmoke
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"Bone Hunters" from 12/11/1954 Radio’s greatest adult western told the story of Matt Dillon, U.S. Marshal, "the first man they look for and the last they want to meet." Gunsmoke grew out of a request from CBS founder William Paley for a "Philip Marlowe in the Old West," and featured grimly realistic stories set in the vicinity of Dodge City, the "Gommorrah of the West," with William Conrad as Dillon.

9:30 pm – 10:00 pm Frontier Gentleman
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"The Actress" from 3/23/1958 This excellent Western series, created by Antony Ellis, aired for several months on CBS in 1958. John Dehner starred as British reporter J.B. Kendall, who traveled the Wild West in search of stories of adventure. Versatile radio stars like Virginia Gregg, Jospeh Kearns, Stacy Harris and more were featured throughout.

10:00 pm – 10:30 pm Rocky Jordan
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"Strangers Three" from 12/5/1948 Rocky Jordan operated a café in exotic Cairo, a city filled with danger and intrigue, and spent much of his time solving crimes. The detective show was based on an earlier program called A Man Named Jordan.

10:30 pm – 11:00 pm Yours Truly, Johnny Dollar
close Yours Truly, Johnny Dollar

"The Blinker Matter" from 7/6/1958 Yours Truly, Johnny Dollar told the story of the freelance insurance investigator with the "action-packed expense account." Radio’s last great detective series, Yours Truly, Johnny Dollar ended its run September 30, 1962 during the final week of network radio drama.

11:00 pm – 11:30 pm Adventures of Philip Marlowe
close Adventures of Philip Marlowe

"The Big Step" from 2/28/1950 Raymond Chandler introduced readers to Philip Marlowe in his 1939 novel The Big Sleep. Humphrey Bogart, Robert Montgomery and George Montgomery portrayed the hardboiled detective in films before Van Heflin took over as Marlowe in NBC’s 1947 summer series.The Adventures of Philip Marlowe returned September 26, 1948, as a CBS series and starred Gerald Mohr. CBS Chairman William S. Paley was a big fan of The Adventures of Philip Marlowe, and his request for a "Philip Marlowe in the West" led to the development of the legendary western Gunsmoke.

11:30 pm – Wednesday Midnight Box 13
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"Dan & The Wonderful Lamp" from 12/18/1948 Alan Ladd stars as Dan Holiday, a fiction writer and retired reporter with a taste for adventure. The show was also produced by Alan Ladd's company, Mayfair Productions. Sylvia Picker portrayed Suzy, his scatterbrained office manager.

Thursday 11/23
12:00 am – 12:30 am Further Adventures of Sherlock Holmes
close Further Adventures of Sherlock Holmes

"The Dying Detective" from 1/17/2010 Jim French wrote this modern adaptation of mystery's most famous detective as part of the Imagination Theatre productions. These plays were produced and aired in the '00s. John Patrick Lowrie plays Holmes and Lawrence Albert portrays Watson.

12:30 am – 1:00 am Have Gun, Will Travel
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"The Lonely One" from 1/10/1960 Have Gun, Will Travel debuted on television on September 14, 1957 and moved to radio November 23, 1958. The program was an oddity, a western that began on television and moved to radio, featuring an ethical anti-hero whose mysterious origins were left untold until the fifth and final TV season.

1:00 am – 1:30 am The Shadow
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"Blind Beggar Dies" from 4/17/1938 The Shadow debuted July 31, 1930 as the sinister narrator of CBS’ Street & Smith’s Detective Story Hour. The popularity of the phantom host led the nation’s largest publisher of pulp fiction to launch a mystery magazine devoted to The Shadow’s adventures.

1:30 am – 2:00 am Suspense
close Suspense

"A Matter Of Timing" from 6/12/1956 Suspense debuted on June 17, 1942 as a sustaining summer replacement, returned that fall and continued in the CBS lineup until September 30, 1962. "Radio's outstanding theatre of thrills" is recognized as one of the finest dramatic series in the history of broadcasting.

2:00 am – 3:30 am Yours Truly, Johnny Dollar
close Yours Truly, Johnny Dollar

"The Alder Matter" from 8/6/1956 Yours Truly, Johnny Dollar told the story of the freelance insurance investigator with the "action-packed expense account." Radio’s last great detective series, Yours Truly, Johnny Dollar ended its run September 30, 1962 during the final week of network radio drama.

3:30 am – 4:00 am Broadway is My Beat
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"Joan Fuller Murder Case" from 11/17/1950 Broadway Is My Beat debuted over CBS on February 27, 1949 and continued through August 1, 1954. Anthony Ross starred as Clover during the first two seasons, with Thor taking over the role on July 3, 1950. Homicide detective Clover pounded the Broadway beat for five years in one of radio's last great detective series.

4:00 am – 4:30 am Phil Harris & Alice Faye Show
close Phil Harris & Alice Faye Show

"Frankie & The Turkey" from 11/19/1950 The Phil Harris & Alice Faye Show grew out of the popular Fitch Bandwagon series. Phil Harris played himself, continuing the egotistical, smart-alec characterization he had perfected during his years as Jack Bennys' bandleader. Alice Faye, Phil's movie star wife, recreated her real-life role as a film star turn devoted housewife.

4:30 am – 5:00 am Our Miss Brooks
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"Thanksgiving Turkey" from 11/19/1950 Eve Arden portrays Miss Connie Brooks, an overworked and underpaid teacher of 10th grade English at Madison High School. Our Miss Brooks called her radio classroom to order beginning July 19, 1948. The final bell rang for Our Miss Brooks on July 7, 1957.

5:00 am – 5:30 am Father Knows Best
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"Thanksgiving" from 11/26/1953 NBC's Father Knows Best depicted the lives of the Anderson family, an average American family living in an average American town. Robert Young starred as Jim Anderson, the easy-going and sensible father. Young was the only cast member to survive the transition from radio to television.

5:30 am – 6:00 am Abbott and Costello Show
close Abbott and Costello Show

"Guest: Jane Wyman" from 11/25/1943 Bud Abbott and Lou Costello made their radio debut on CBS’ The Kate Smith Show as replacements for Hollywood-bound Henny Youngman. The former burlesque comics reintroduced and preserved the classic comedy sketches of vaudeville in their films and radio and television series. The Abbott and Costello Show debuted as a 1940 summer replacement for Fred Allen and later aired from October 8, 1942 through June 29, 1949.

6:00 am – 6:30 am Hopalong Cassidy
close Hopalong Cassidy

"Bandits Of Ridge Creek" from 4/2/1950 Hopalong Cassidy's millions of fans got a New Year's Day present in 1950 when William Boyd brought the famous Bar-20 Ranch onto the Mutual radio range. In 1950, Clarence Mulford's classic cowboy was heard on 152 radio stations, seen on 63 television outlets and appeared as a comic strip in 155 newspapers.

6:30 am – 7:00 am The Cisco Kid
close The Cisco Kid

"The Son Of The Chief" from 1/21/1954 The Cisco Kid rode onto the Mutual airwaves on October 2, 1942, in a series that starred the versatile Jackson Beck. Cisco and his partner Pancho rode off the Mutual trail on December 14, 1945, but the characters returned to the airwaves two years later in a new version that was broadcast over the Don Lee Pacific Coast Network. Jack Mather and Harry Lang (later replaced by Mel Blanc) portrayed Cisco and Pancho in the later series, which ran for a decade.

7:00 am – 7:30 am CBS Radio Workshop
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"A Writer At Work" from 10/12/1956 The CBS Radio Workshop aired from January 27, 1956 through September 22, 1957 and was a revival of the prestigious Columbia Workshop from the 1930s and 1940s. The CBS Workshop regularly featured the works of the world’s greatest writers. including Ray Bradbury, Archibald MacLeish, William Saroyan, Lord Dunsany and Ambrose Bierce.

7:30 am – 8:00 am Burns & Allen Show
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"Broke Uncle Hubert" from 4/20/1943 George and Gracie first performed on air over the BBC while touring England after an NBC executive rejected their act insisting that "Gracie’s voice is unfit for radio." Burns and Allen won a regular spot on The Robert Burns Panatella Program February 22, 1932 and moved into the top spot when Guy Lombardo left the series. The Burns and Allen Show aired through May 17, 1950 on radio and for another decade on television. Jack Benny and George Burns were best friends in real life and often were guests on each other’s programs.

8:00 am – 8:30 am Damon Runyon Theatre
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"What, No Butler?" from 12/4/1949 This anthology series dramatized the stories of fiction author Damon Runyon and aired in various forms from the late 1940s to the mid 1950s. John Brown starred as "Broadway," a fluent "Brooklynese" speaker who spun tales of old Manhattan.

8:30 am – 9:00 am Night Beat
close Night Beat

"Showgirl Is A Pickpocket?" from 8/14/1952 Frank Lovejoy is heard as Randy "Lucky" Stone, a hardboiled reporter who covers the "nightbeat" for the Chicago Star. Randy Stone wandered the back alleys and bars of Chicago, searching for both crime and human-interest stories. Nightbeat premiered on February 6, 1950 and ran until September 25, 1952.

9:00 am – 9:30 am The Six Shooter
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"Anna Nordquist" from 5/6/1954 The Six Shooter aired started movie star James Stewart rode the radio range from September 20, 1953 through June 24, 1954 as Britt Ponset, "the Texas plainsman who wandered through the western territories, leaving behind a trail of still-remembered legends."

9:30 am – 10:00 am Gunsmoke
close Gunsmoke

"Legal Revenge" from 2/5/1956 Radio’s greatest adult western told the story of Matt Dillon, U.S. Marshal, "the first man they look for and the last they want to meet." Gunsmoke grew out of a request from CBS founder William Paley for a "Philip Marlowe in the Old West," and featured grimly realistic stories set in the vicinity of Dodge City, the "Gommorrah of the West," with William Conrad as Dillon.

10:00 am – 10:30 am Life of Riley
close Life of Riley

"Thanksgiving Flashback" from 11/19/1948 The Life of Riley featured the comic misadventures of riveter Chester A. Riley. Riley was a devoted family man with a talent for flying off the handle and a penchant for being worse. Movie star William Bendix played the title role of the lovable hardhat throughout the series.

10:30 am – 11:00 am Our Miss Brooks
close Our Miss Brooks

"Thanksgiving Weekend" from 11/27/1949 Eve Arden portrays Miss Connie Brooks, an overworked and underpaid teacher of 10th grade English at Madison High School. Our Miss Brooks called her radio classroom to order beginning July 19, 1948. The final bell rang for Our Miss Brooks on July 7, 1957.

11:00 am – 11:30 am Great Gildersleeve
close Great Gildersleeve

"Thanksgiving Time" from 11/22/1942 The Great Gildersleeve featured one of radio’s greatest casts of comedic players. The Great Gildersleeve aired until March 21, 1957, with Willard Waterman taking over the title role for the final seven radio season and three television seasons.

11:30 am – 12:00 pm The Wonder Show
close The Wonder Show

"Sgt. O'Haley" from 11/25/1938

12:00 pm – 1:00 pm When Radio Was
close When Radio Was

Radio Spirits' nationally syndicated radio program hosted by old-time radio expert Greg Bell

1:00 pm – 1:30 pm Father Knows Best
close Father Knows Best

"Thanksgiving Prayer" from 11/22/1951 NBC's Father Knows Best depicted the lives of the Anderson family, an average American family living in an average American town. Robert Young starred as Jim Anderson, the easy-going and sensible father. Young was the only cast member to survive the transition from radio to television.

1:30 pm – 2:00 pm Life With Luigi
close Life With Luigi

"Luigi Arrives In America" (Debut) from 9/21/1948 Longtime Hollywood character actor J. Carrol Naish became a radio star in his own right after nearly two decades toiling in the background in such films as Beau Geste, House of Frankenstein and the Batman movie serial. The native New Yorker of Irish descent finally won fame as "the little Italian immigrant" who each week wrote of his American adventures to his mama in Italy. Life with Luigi aired from September 21, 1948 through March 3, 1953 on radio, and the radio cast briefly did double duty in a short-lived 1952 television version.

2:00 pm – 2:30 pm Jack Benny Program
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"Thanksgiving At Mary's House" from 11/26/1944 For more than 20 years, Jack Benny reigned as the king of radio comedy. His show ran on nearly every network from 1932 to the mid 1950s. How he turned a miserable, self-absorbed cheapskate into a beloved icon ranks among the great achievements in entertainment history. Benny revolutionized the way humor was played on radio by introducing the situation comedy and by giving most of the best lines to his supporting cast.

2:30 pm – 3:00 pm Life of Riley
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"Thanksgiving Dinner With Boss" from 11/25/1949 The Life of Riley featured the comic misadventures of riveter Chester A. Riley. Riley was a devoted family man with a talent for flying off the handle and a penchant for being worse. Movie star William Bendix played the title role of the lovable hardhat throughout the series.

3:00 pm – 3:30 pm Fibber McGee & Molly
close Fibber McGee & Molly

"Duck Hunting" from 12/2/1947 The husband-and-wife vaudeville team of Jim and Marian Jordan began their radio careers in Peoria on a bet from Jim’s brother. The Jordans were heard as The O’Henry Twins and The Air Scouts before Don Quinn created Smackout in 1931. Quinn revamped the show as Fibber McGee and Molly in 1935 when Johnson’s Wax signed on as sponsor.

3:30 pm – 4:00 pm Red Skelton Show
close Red Skelton Show

"Town Hall: Radio Irritation" from 3/30/1948 The Red Skelton Show came to NBC on October 7, 1941 after years as a mainstay on Cincinnati's powerhouse station WLW. Red scored with radio audiences as Junior, "the mean widdle kid," a character he originated in vaudeville. Some of his other memorable characters included Deadeye, J. Newton Numbskull, Willie Lump-Lump, Bolivar Shagnasty and Clem Kadiddlehopper.

4:00 pm – 4:30 pm Great Gildersleeve
close Great Gildersleeve

"Servicemen Over For Thanksgiving" from 11/16/1941 The Great Gildersleeve featured one of radio’s greatest casts of comedic players. The Great Gildersleeve aired until March 21, 1957, with Willard Waterman taking over the title role for the final seven radio season and three television seasons.

4:30 pm – 5:00 pm Jack Carson Show
close Jack Carson Show

"Thanksgiving Dinner" from 11/27/1946 Carson, who began his career as a vaudeville actor, got his break in radio with a 1938 performance on The Kraft Music Hall with Bing Crosby. After a few standout bit roles in movies, Carson landed his own radio show on CBS, which debuted on June 2, 1943. The show centered around the host's hectic Hollywood life, famous friends and strange relatives - Carson's old vaudeville partner Dave Willock even played the part of his nephew Tugwell.

5:00 pm – 5:30 pm Michael Shayne
close Michael Shayne

"Case Of Tahlani's Tears" from 1/15/1949 Detective Michael Shayne was created by Davis Dresser (writing under the pen name Brett Halliday). "Dividend of Death," the first of more than 60 novels featuring the Miami-based private detective was published in 1939. The adventures of the "reckless red-headed Irishman," played by Wally Maher, came to radio October 16, 1944 and aired for 3 years.

5:30 pm – 6:00 pm This Is Your F.B.I
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"The Stranger" from 10/19/1951 This Is Your F.B.I. came to the Blue Network on April 6, 1945, created, produced and directed by Jerry Devine, a former child actor. Like Philips H. Lord before him, Devine got special permission from bureau head J. Edgar Hoover to dramatize older cases using fictitious names and locales. Frank Lovejoy was the program's first narrator, followed by Dean Carlton and later William Woodson.

6:00 pm – 6:30 pm Honest Harold
close Honest Harold

"Thanksgiving Play" from 11/22/1950 AKA "The Harold Peary Show" -- Peary, best known for his role as Gildersleeve on the Fibber McGee & Molly Show (and later on The Great Gildserleeve), starred in this short-lived sitcom. After acting as Gildersleeve on NBC for more than 10 years, Peary switched to CBS for this series, which only ran for one season. However, during the show's run, then-governor Earl Warren awarded Peary for his 10,000th radio broadcast (Warren later became Chief Justice of the US Supreme Court)

6:30 pm – 7:00 pm The Aldrich Family
close The Aldrich Family

"Thanksgiving" from 1952 The character of Henry Aldrich was introduced in Clifford Goldsmith's 1937 play, "What a Life". Ezra Stone originated the role of "America's favorite teenager" on Broadway and portrayed the role for nearly a decade on radio. After being featured in short skits on variety shows, The Aldrich Family debuted as Jack Benny's summer replacement on July 2, 1939. The series moved into its own NBC timeslot on October 10, 1939 and continued until April 19, 1953. Stone received his draft notice in the summer of 1941 but continued as Henry for the next season. Norman Tokar replaced Stone the following season, followed by Dickie Jones and Raymond Ives. After completing his military service in 1945, Stone returned to the role he had originated and was heard as Henry though the early 1950s when Bobby Ellis took over the role on both radio and television.

7:00 pm – 7:30 pm Abbott and Costello Show
close Abbott and Costello Show

"Thanksgiving Show" from 11/25/1948 Bud Abbott and Lou Costello made their radio debut on CBS’ The Kate Smith Show as replacements for Hollywood-bound Henny Youngman. The former burlesque comics reintroduced and preserved the classic comedy sketches of vaudeville in their films and radio and television series. The Abbott and Costello Show debuted as a 1940 summer replacement for Fred Allen and later aired from October 8, 1942 through June 29, 1949.

7:30 pm – 8:00 pm My Favorite Husband
close My Favorite Husband

"Liz In The Hospital" from 5/27/1949 My Favorite Husband told the story of George and Liz Cooper, "two people who live together and like it." The radio series was based on Isabel Rorick's novel Mr. And Mrs. Cugat. The show's audition broadcast featured Lucille Ball and Lee Bowman as her husband.

8:00 pm – 10:00 pm Jack Benny Program
close Jack Benny Program

"Too Hot To Handle" from 11/20/1938 --- "Turkey Murder Dream" from 11/30/1947 --- "Dreams He's A Turkey" from 11/21/1943 --- "Ostrich For Thanksgiving" from 11/19/1939 For more than 20 years, Jack Benny reigned as the king of radio comedy. His show ran on nearly every network from 1932 to the mid 1950s. How he turned a miserable, self-absorbed cheapskate into a beloved icon ranks among the great achievements in entertainment history. Benny revolutionized the way humor was played on radio by introducing the situation comedy and by giving most of the best lines to his supporting cast.

10:00 pm – 10:30 pm Charlie McCarthy Show
close Charlie McCarthy Show

"Guest: Elsa Maxwell" from 11/19/1944 Ventriloquist Edgar Bergen developed his Charlie McCarthy character in high school. Bergen performed with the newsboy dummy while attending Northwestern University and eventually left college to tour vaudeville. With the decline of vaudeville during the Great Depression, Bergen moved into night spots like New York’s trendy Rainbow Room but feared his friend wouldn’t be appreciated by high society. So he gave Charlie a monocle and top hat and a "man about town" was born. Following a three-month guest stint on Rudy Vallee’s show, Edgar Bergen was signed as headliner of The Chase and Sanborn Hour. The series premiered May 9, 1937 and ended the next three seasons as radio’s top-rated series.

10:30 pm – 11:00 pm Life of Riley
close Life of Riley

"Thanksgiving With The Gillis's" from 11/29/1947 The Life of Riley featured the comic misadventures of riveter Chester A. Riley. Riley was a devoted family man with a talent for flying off the handle and a penchant for being worse. Movie star William Bendix played the title role of the lovable hardhat throughout the series.

11:00 pm – 11:30 pm Let George Do It
close Let George Do It

"Cause For Thanksgiving" from 11/20/1950 Let George Do It stars Bob Bailey as George Valentine, a detective whose cases came from the newspaper.

11:30 pm – Thursday Midnight Suspense
close Suspense

"Screaming Woman" from 11/25/1948 Suspense debuted on June 17, 1942 as a sustaining summer replacement, returned that fall and continued in the CBS lineup until September 30, 1962. "Radio's outstanding theatre of thrills" is recognized as one of the finest dramatic series in the history of broadcasting.

Friday 11/24
12:00 am – 1:00 am Screen Director's Playhouse
close Screen Director's Playhouse

"The Lady Gambles" from 12/14/1950 The Screen Director's Playhouse featured adaptations of famous movies and called upon the screen directors to introduce and highlight their work. After each show, the director and stars gathered around the microphones to reminisce about the actual making of the film.

1:00 am – 1:30 am Pursuit
close Pursuit

"The Loch Ness Killer"from 12/11/1951 Inspector Peter Black of Scotland Yard chased bad guys in this CBS detective drama from October of '49-May March '52. Black would be portrayed by Ted de Corsia, John Dehner, and Ben Wright in the show's lifetime.

1:30 am – 2:00 am Jack Benny Program
close Jack Benny Program

Guest: Groucho Marx from 2/20/1944 For more than 20 years, Jack Benny reigned as the king of radio comedy. His show ran on nearly every network from 1932 to the mid 1950s. How he turned a miserable, self-absorbed cheapskate into a beloved icon ranks among the great achievements in entertainment history. Benny revolutionized the way humor was played on radio by introducing the situation comedy and by giving most of the best lines to his supporting cast.

2:00 am – 3:30 am Frontier Gentleman
close Frontier Gentleman

"Belle Siddon's Encore" from 8/24/1958 --- "Belle Siddon Strikes" from 8/31/1958 --- "The Last of Belle Siddon" from 9/7/1958 This excellent Western series, created by Antony Ellis, aired for several months on CBS in 1958. John Dehner starred as British reporter J.B. Kendall, who traveled the Wild West in search of stories of adventure. Versatile radio stars like Virginia Gregg, Jospeh Kearns, Stacy Harris and more were featured throughout.

3:30 am – 4:00 am Escape - Radio Classics
close Escape - Radio Classics

"Bird Of Paradise" from 3/11/1954 Radio's greatest series of high adventure debuted over the CBS network on July 7,1947. Escape's protagonists faced life-and-death situations each week, as the show careened from classic adventure to Western drama to science fiction. The program was broadcast as a sustainer (unsponsored) series during most of its seven-year run.

4:00 am – 4:30 am Box 13
close Box 13

"Speed To Burn" from 1/17/1949 Alan Ladd stars as Dan Holiday, a fiction writer and retired reporter with a taste for adventure. The show was also produced by Alan Ladd's company, Mayfair Productions. Sylvia Picker portrayed Suzy, his scatterbrained office manager.

4:30 am – 5:00 am The Whistler
close The Whistler

"The Man From Calais" from 2/7/1954 The Whistler whistled its way onto the airwaves beginning May 16, 1942 and its eerie 13-note theme set the tone for West Coast radio mystery for the next decade. "I am the Whistler and I know many things, for I walk by night. I know many strange tales hidden in the hearts of men and women who have stepped into the shadows. Yes, I know the nameless terrors of which they dare not speak."

5:00 am – 5:30 am The Weird Circle
close The Weird Circle

"Last Day Of A Condemned Man" from 12/10/1944 This horror series consisted mostly of adapted supernatural tales from greats like Edgar Allen Poe and Robert Louis Stevenson. It aired for two seasons from 1943-1945, first on Mutual and then on NBC's Red network.

5:30 am – 6:00 am The Whistler
close The Whistler

"Golden Penny" from 9/10/1944 The Whistler whistled its way onto the airwaves beginning May 16, 1942 and its eerie 13-note theme set the tone for West Coast radio mystery for the next decade. "I am the Whistler and I know many things, for I walk by night. I know many strange tales hidden in the hearts of men and women who have stepped into the shadows. Yes, I know the nameless terrors of which they dare not speak."

6:00 am – 8:00 am Dragnet
close Dragnet

Joe Friday Black Friday Marathon "The Big Cat" from 6/15/1954 "The Big Bible" from 9/28/1954 "The Big Cup" from 3/9/1954 "The Big Poison" from 9/7/1950 One of the most popular police dramas in the history of broadcasting, Dragnet aired on NBC Radio from June 10, 1949 through February 7, 1957 and on television from 1952-59 and 1967-72. Dragnet introduced a new era of documentary-style realism.

8:00 am – 10:00 am Dragnet
close Dragnet

Joe Friday Black Friday Marathon "The Big Rescue" from 7/13/1954 "The Big Bill" from 1/19/1954 "The Big Job" from 4/27/1950 "The Big Mole" from 12/7/1952 One of the most popular police dramas in the history of broadcasting, Dragnet aired on NBC Radio from June 10, 1949 through February 7, 1957 and on television from 1952-59 and 1967-72. Dragnet introduced a new era of documentary-style realism.

10:00 am – 12:00 pm Dragnet
close Dragnet

Joe Friday Black Friday Marathon "The Big Cad" from 8/18/1954 "The Big Match" from 7/27/1954 "The Big Set-Up" from 3/1/1955 "The Big .38" from 10/5/1950 One of the most popular police dramas in the history of broadcasting, Dragnet aired on NBC Radio from June 10, 1949 through February 7, 1957 and on television from 1952-59 and 1967-72. Dragnet introduced a new era of documentary-style realism.

12:00 pm – 1:00 pm When Radio Was
close When Radio Was

Radio Spirits' nationally syndicated radio program hosted by old-time radio expert Greg Bell

1:00 pm – 1:30 pm The Chase
close The Chase

"Pennypinching Boarding House Owners" from 2/8/1953 This NBC thriller ran for about a year from the spring of 1952 to the summer of 1953. Each unique story entails suspense, action and, of course, a protagonist on the run. The series often featured guest stars who were announcers or actors for other suspenseful series, and many of the scripts were also used in other dramas like The Clock and Inner Sanctum Mysteries.

1:30 pm – 2:00 pm Romance of the Ranchos
close Romance of the Ranchos

"Los Cirrotos - Los Alamitos" from 11/5/1941 This historical drama told tales of early Southern California in "the days of the dons". Stories were based on records from Title Insurance, the show's sponsor. History was made as land changed hands and purposes, causing listeners to think twice about the stories behind their own West Coast land the in mid-1940s.

2:00 pm – 4:00 pm Dragnet
close Dragnet

Joe Friday Black Friday Marathon "The Big Cat" from 6/15/1954 "The Big Bible" from 9/28/1954 "The Big Cup" from 3/9/1954 "The Big Poison" from 9/7/1950 One of the most popular police dramas in the history of broadcasting, Dragnet aired on NBC Radio from June 10, 1949 through February 7, 1957 and on television from 1952-59 and 1967-72. Dragnet introduced a new era of documentary-style realism.

4:00 pm – 6:00 pm Dragnet
close Dragnet

Joe Friday Black Friday Marathon "The Big Rescue" from 7/13/1954 "The Big Bill" from 1/19/1954 "The Big Job" from 4/27/1950 "The Big Mole" from 12/7/1952 One of the most popular police dramas in the history of broadcasting, Dragnet aired on NBC Radio from June 10, 1949 through February 7, 1957 and on television from 1952-59 and 1967-72. Dragnet introduced a new era of documentary-style realism.

6:00 pm – 8:00 pm Dragnet
close Dragnet

Joe Friday Black Friday Marathon "The Big Cad" from 8/18/1954 "The Big Match" from 7/27/1954 "The Big Set-Up" from 3/1/1955 "The Big .38" from 10/5/1950 One of the most popular police dramas in the history of broadcasting, Dragnet aired on NBC Radio from June 10, 1949 through February 7, 1957 and on television from 1952-59 and 1967-72. Dragnet introduced a new era of documentary-style realism.

8:00 pm – 8:30 pm Suspense
close Suspense

"Gold Of The Adomar" from 1/19/1953 Suspense debuted on June 17, 1942 as a sustaining summer replacement, returned that fall and continued in the CBS lineup until September 30, 1962. "Radio's outstanding theatre of thrills" is recognized as one of the finest dramatic series in the history of broadcasting.

8:30 pm – 9:00 pm Man Called X
close Man Called X

"Indian Land Reclamation" from 4/7/1951 Wherever there is mystery, adventure, intrigue, in all the strange and dangerous places in the world, there you will find--The Man Called X! Debonair British actor Herbert Marshall stars as FBI agent Ken Thurston, "the man who crosses the ocean as readily as you and I cross town; he is the man who fights today's war in his unique fashion, so that tomorrow's peace will make the world a neighborhood for all of us." The Man Called X debuted over CBS on July 10, 1944, moved to NBC in 1950 and continued through May 20, 1952.

9:00 pm – 9:30 pm Fort Laramie
close Fort Laramie

"The Beasley Girls" from 3/18/1956 pecially transcribed tales of the dark and tragic ground of the wild frontier. The saga of fighting men who rode the rim of empire and the dramatic story of Lee Quince, Captain of Cavalry. Premiering in January 1956, Raymond Burr starred as Captain Quince-a soldier who followed orders and a leader who lived by his own rules of fairness and honesty.

9:30 pm – 10:00 pm Gunsmoke
close Gunsmoke

"Claustrophobia" from 6/26/1954 Radio’s greatest adult western told the story of Matt Dillon, U.S. Marshal, "the first man they look for and the last they want to meet." Gunsmoke grew out of a request from CBS founder William Paley for a "Philip Marlowe in the Old West," and featured grimly realistic stories set in the vicinity of Dodge City, the "Gommorrah of the West," with William Conrad as Dillon.

10:00 pm – 11:00 pm Suspense
close Suspense

"The Kandy Tooth" from 1/11/1948 Suspense debuted on June 17, 1942 as a sustaining summer replacement, returned that fall and continued in the CBS lineup until September 30, 1962. "Radio's outstanding theatre of thrills" is recognized as one of the finest dramatic series in the history of broadcasting.

11:00 pm – 11:30 pm The Whistler
close The Whistler

"The Choice" from 1/13/1947 The Whistler whistled its way onto the airwaves beginning May 16, 1942 and its eerie 13-note theme set the tone for West Coast radio mystery for the next decade. "I am the Whistler and I know many things, for I walk by night. I know many strange tales hidden in the hearts of men and women who have stepped into the shadows. Yes, I know the nameless terrors of which they dare not speak."

11:30 pm – Friday Midnight Frontier Fighters
close Frontier Fighters

"Dr. John McLoughlin" from 1935 This series consisted of episodes about true historical adventures in the American West. Some of the stories include Lewis & Clark, the Oregon boundary dispute, and the purchase of Alaska. The original broadcast dates for Frontier Fighters are still unclear; the series ran sometime during the 1930s.

Saturday 11/25
12:00 am – 2:00 am Jack Benny Program
close Jack Benny Program

"Too Hot To Handle" from 11/20/1938 --- "Turkey Murder Dream" from 11/30/1947 --- "Dreams He's A Turkey" from 11/21/1943 --- "Ostrich For Thanksgiving" from 11/19/1939 For more than 20 years, Jack Benny reigned as the king of radio comedy. His show ran on nearly every network from 1932 to the mid 1950s. How he turned a miserable, self-absorbed cheapskate into a beloved icon ranks among the great achievements in entertainment history. Benny revolutionized the way humor was played on radio by introducing the situation comedy and by giving most of the best lines to his supporting cast.

2:00 am – 2:30 am Damon Runyon Theatre
close Damon Runyon Theatre

"What, No Butler?" from 12/4/1949 This anthology series dramatized the stories of fiction author Damon Runyon and aired in various forms from the late 1940s to the mid 1950s. John Brown starred as "Broadway," a fluent "Brooklynese" speaker who spun tales of old Manhattan.

2:30 am – 3:00 am Night Beat
close Night Beat

"Showgirl Is A Pickpocket?" from 8/14/1952 Frank Lovejoy is heard as Randy "Lucky" Stone, a hardboiled reporter who covers the "nightbeat" for the Chicago Star. Randy Stone wandered the back alleys and bars of Chicago, searching for both crime and human-interest stories. Nightbeat premiered on February 6, 1950 and ran until September 25, 1952.

3:00 am – 3:30 am The Six Shooter
close The Six Shooter

"Anna Nordquist" from 5/6/1954 The Six Shooter aired started movie star James Stewart rode the radio range from September 20, 1953 through June 24, 1954 as Britt Ponset, "the Texas plainsman who wandered through the western territories, leaving behind a trail of still-remembered legends."

3:30 am – 4:00 am Gunsmoke
close Gunsmoke

"Legal Revenge" from 2/5/1956 Radio’s greatest adult western told the story of Matt Dillon, U.S. Marshal, "the first man they look for and the last they want to meet." Gunsmoke grew out of a request from CBS founder William Paley for a "Philip Marlowe in the Old West," and featured grimly realistic stories set in the vicinity of Dodge City, the "Gommorrah of the West," with William Conrad as Dillon.

4:00 am – 4:30 am Jack Benny Program
close Jack Benny Program

"Thanksgiving At Mary's House" from 11/26/1944 For more than 20 years, Jack Benny reigned as the king of radio comedy. His show ran on nearly every network from 1932 to the mid 1950s. How he turned a miserable, self-absorbed cheapskate into a beloved icon ranks among the great achievements in entertainment history. Benny revolutionized the way humor was played on radio by introducing the situation comedy and by giving most of the best lines to his supporting cast.

4:30 am – 5:00 am Life of Riley
close Life of Riley

"Thanksgiving Dinner With Boss" from 11/25/1949 The Life of Riley featured the comic misadventures of riveter Chester A. Riley. Riley was a devoted family man with a talent for flying off the handle and a penchant for being worse. Movie star William Bendix played the title role of the lovable hardhat throughout the series.

5:00 am – 5:30 am Fibber McGee & Molly
close Fibber McGee & Molly

"Duck Hunting" from 12/2/1947 The husband-and-wife vaudeville team of Jim and Marian Jordan began their radio careers in Peoria on a bet from Jim’s brother. The Jordans were heard as The O’Henry Twins and The Air Scouts before Don Quinn created Smackout in 1931. Quinn revamped the show as Fibber McGee and Molly in 1935 when Johnson’s Wax signed on as sponsor.

5:30 am – 6:00 am Red Skelton Show
close Red Skelton Show

"Town Hall: Radio Irritation" from 3/30/1948 The Red Skelton Show came to NBC on October 7, 1941 after years as a mainstay on Cincinnati's powerhouse station WLW. Red scored with radio audiences as Junior, "the mean widdle kid," a character he originated in vaudeville. Some of his other memorable characters included Deadeye, J. Newton Numbskull, Willie Lump-Lump, Bolivar Shagnasty and Clem Kadiddlehopper.

6:00 am – 6:30 am Inner Sanctum Mysteries
close Inner Sanctum Mysteries

"Corridor Of Doom" from 10/23/1945 Inner Sanctum's sinister host welcomed listeners "through the squeaking door to another night of horror." The show’s "squeaking door" was one of radio’s most-remembered openings and was inspired by the creaking hinges on a sound effects door at the radio studio.

6:30 am – 7:00 am Suspense
close Suspense

"Drury's Bones" from 1/25/1945 Suspense debuted on June 17, 1942 as a sustaining summer replacement, returned that fall and continued in the CBS lineup until September 30, 1962. "Radio's outstanding theatre of thrills" is recognized as one of the finest dramatic series in the history of broadcasting.

7:00 am – 8:00 am Lights Out!
close Lights Out!

"Meteor Man" from 12/22/1942 --- "Nature Study" from 6/22/1943 Lights Out debuted January 1, 1934 over Chicago’s WENR and moved onto the NBC airwaves beginning April 17, 1935. Radio’s premier horror series was created by writer/ director Wyllis Cooper. Cooper was succeeded by Arch Oboler, one of radio’s greatest dramatic talents.

8:00 am – 9:00 am When Radio Was
close When Radio Was

Radio Spirits' nationally syndicated radio program hosted by old-time radio expert Greg Bell

9:00 am – 9:30 am Richard Diamond, Private Detective
close Richard Diamond, Private Detective

"Ralph Baxter Case" from 4/26/1950 Richard Diamond, Private Detective premiered over the NBC network on April 24, 1949 and ran through 1952 starring Dick Powell as "radio's singing detective." Powell had first achieved movie stardom as a baby-faced crooner, and later matured to hardboiled roles, including Raymond Chandler's Philip Marlowe in the 1944 film Murder My Sweet.

9:30 am – 10:00 am Gunsmoke
close Gunsmoke

"Hinka-Do" from 10/10/1952 Radio’s greatest adult western told the story of Matt Dillon, U.S. Marshal, "the first man they look for and the last they want to meet." Gunsmoke grew out of a request from CBS founder William Paley for a "Philip Marlowe in the Old West," and featured grimly realistic stories set in the vicinity of Dodge City, the "Gommorrah of the West," with William Conrad as Dillon.

10:00 am – 10:30 am Further Adventures of Sherlock Holmes
close Further Adventures of Sherlock Holmes

"The Dying Detective" from 1/17/2010 Jim French wrote this modern adaptation of mystery's most famous detective as part of the Imagination Theatre productions. These plays were produced and aired in the '00s. John Patrick Lowrie plays Holmes and Lawrence Albert portrays Watson.

10:30 am – 11:00 am Have Gun, Will Travel
close Have Gun, Will Travel

"The Lonely One" from 1/10/1960 Have Gun, Will Travel debuted on television on September 14, 1957 and moved to radio November 23, 1958. The program was an oddity, a western that began on television and moved to radio, featuring an ethical anti-hero whose mysterious origins were left untold until the fifth and final TV season.

11:00 am – 11:30 am The Shadow
close The Shadow

"Blind Beggar Dies" from 4/17/1938 The Shadow debuted July 31, 1930 as the sinister narrator of CBS’ Street & Smith’s Detective Story Hour. The popularity of the phantom host led the nation’s largest publisher of pulp fiction to launch a mystery magazine devoted to The Shadow’s adventures.

11:30 am – 12:00 pm Suspense
close Suspense

"A Matter Of Timing" from 6/12/1956 Suspense debuted on June 17, 1942 as a sustaining summer replacement, returned that fall and continued in the CBS lineup until September 30, 1962. "Radio's outstanding theatre of thrills" is recognized as one of the finest dramatic series in the history of broadcasting.

12:00 pm – 12:30 pm Adventures of Sam Spade
close Adventures of Sam Spade

"The Dry Martini Caper" 8/1/1948 Dashiell Hammett's Sam Spade walked out of the pages of Black Mask and into his own CBS radio series of July 12, 1946. Howard Duff starred as the hardboiled detective for the first three seasons. Lurene Tuttle was Sam's secretary Effie Perrine and Jerry Hausner was his lawyer Sid Weiss. CBS dropped the series in 1950 when Hammett ran afoul of Congress' Un-American Activities investigators, but the show was quickly revived by NBC.

12:30 pm – 1:00 pm The Whistler
close The Whistler

"Witness At The Fountain" from 9/9/1946 The Whistler whistled its way onto the airwaves beginning May 16, 1942 and its eerie 13-note theme set the tone for West Coast radio mystery for the next decade. "I am the Whistler and I know many things, for I walk by night. I know many strange tales hidden in the hearts of men and women who have stepped into the shadows. Yes, I know the nameless terrors of which they dare not speak."

1:00 pm – 1:30 pm Adventures of Sam Spade
close Adventures of Sam Spade

"Red Amapola Caper (Rehearsal)" from 5/21/1950 Dashiell Hammett's Sam Spade walked out of the pages of Black Mask and into his own CBS radio series of July 12, 1946. Howard Duff starred as the hardboiled detective for the first three seasons. Lurene Tuttle was Sam's secretary Effie Perrine and Jerry Hausner was his lawyer Sid Weiss. CBS dropped the series in 1950 when Hammett ran afoul of Congress' Un-American Activities investigators, but the show was quickly revived by NBC.

1:30 pm – 2:00 pm Suspense
close Suspense

"A Murderous Revision" from 12/3/1951 Suspense debuted on June 17, 1942 as a sustaining summer replacement, returned that fall and continued in the CBS lineup until September 30, 1962. "Radio's outstanding theatre of thrills" is recognized as one of the finest dramatic series in the history of broadcasting.

2:00 pm – 2:30 pm Charlie McCarthy Show
close Charlie McCarthy Show

"Guest: Elsa Maxwell" from 11/19/1944 Ventriloquist Edgar Bergen developed his Charlie McCarthy character in high school. Bergen performed with the newsboy dummy while attending Northwestern University and eventually left college to tour vaudeville. With the decline of vaudeville during the Great Depression, Bergen moved into night spots like New York’s trendy Rainbow Room but feared his friend wouldn’t be appreciated by high society. So he gave Charlie a monocle and top hat and a "man about town" was born. Following a three-month guest stint on Rudy Vallee’s show, Edgar Bergen was signed as headliner of The Chase and Sanborn Hour. The series premiered May 9, 1937 and ended the next three seasons as radio’s top-rated series.

2:30 pm – 3:00 pm Life of Riley
close Life of Riley

"Thanksgiving With The Gillis's" from 11/29/1947 The Life of Riley featured the comic misadventures of riveter Chester A. Riley. Riley was a devoted family man with a talent for flying off the handle and a penchant for being worse. Movie star William Bendix played the title role of the lovable hardhat throughout the series.

3:00 pm – 3:30 pm Let George Do It
close Let George Do It

"Cause For Thanksgiving" from 11/20/1950 Let George Do It stars Bob Bailey as George Valentine, a detective whose cases came from the newspaper.

3:30 pm – 4:00 pm Suspense
close Suspense

"Screaming Woman" from 11/25/1948 Suspense debuted on June 17, 1942 as a sustaining summer replacement, returned that fall and continued in the CBS lineup until September 30, 1962. "Radio's outstanding theatre of thrills" is recognized as one of the finest dramatic series in the history of broadcasting.

4:00 pm – 4:30 pm Dr. Kildare
close Dr. Kildare

"Eddie Jenkins & The Arsonist" from 10/20/1950 This medical drama was based on films by the same name. Lews Ayes as Dr. Kildare and Lionel Barrymore as Dr. Gillespie face everything from pushy administrators to personal drama and ethical crises in the halls of Blair General Hospital in New York City

4:30 pm – 5:00 pm Big Town
close Big Town

"Parole Board" from 11/30/19 Edward G. Robinson starred as crusading newspaper editor Steve Wilson from October 19, 1937 through July 2, 1942. The Hollywood great was glad to play an idealistic role in contrast to his many film gangster portrayals. Big Town at its peak was radio’s highest-rated drama and was only eclipsed by The Jack Benny Program in ratings. The series was canceled when Edward G. Robinson quit in 1942 but was resurrected the following year with Edward Pawley (and later Walter Greaza) as Wilson and Fran Carlon as Lorelei. The revived Big Town aired from October 5, 1943 through June 25, 1952.

5:00 pm – 5:30 pm Night Beat
close Night Beat

"Gunner's Last Flight" from 8/14/1950 Frank Lovejoy is heard as Randy "Lucky" Stone, a hardboiled reporter who covers the "nightbeat" for the Chicago Star. Randy Stone wandered the back alleys and bars of Chicago, searching for both crime and human-interest stories. Nightbeat premiered on February 6, 1950 and ran until September 25, 1952.

5:30 pm – 6:00 pm Suspense
close Suspense

"Vial Of Death" from 5/18/1953 Suspense debuted on June 17, 1942 as a sustaining summer replacement, returned that fall and continued in the CBS lineup until September 30, 1962. "Radio's outstanding theatre of thrills" is recognized as one of the finest dramatic series in the history of broadcasting.

6:00 pm – 6:30 pm Frontier Gentleman
close Frontier Gentleman

"Belljoy's Prisoner" from 6/8/1958 This excellent Western series, created by Antony Ellis, aired for several months on CBS in 1958. John Dehner starred as British reporter J.B. Kendall, who traveled the Wild West in search of stories of adventure. Versatile radio stars like Virginia Gregg, Jospeh Kearns, Stacy Harris and more were featured throughout.

6:30 pm – 7:30 pm The Whistler
close The Whistler

"Lady With A Knife" from 12/3/1950 "High Death" from 3/11/1951 The Whistler whistled its way onto the airwaves beginning May 16, 1942 and its eerie 13-note theme set the tone for West Coast radio mystery for the next decade. "I am the Whistler and I know many things, for I walk by night. I know many strange tales hidden in the hearts of men and women who have stepped into the shadows. Yes, I know the nameless terrors of which they dare not speak."

7:30 pm – 8:00 pm Suspense
close Suspense

"Stool Pigeon" from 9/20/1955 Suspense debuted on June 17, 1942 as a sustaining summer replacement, returned that fall and continued in the CBS lineup until September 30, 1962. "Radio's outstanding theatre of thrills" is recognized as one of the finest dramatic series in the history of broadcasting.

8:00 pm – 8:30 pm Alan Young Show
close Alan Young Show

"Cowboy Blood" from 5/23/1947 This sitcom aired from 1944-1949, first as a summer replacement series for Eddie Cantor's show. Then, after signing on as a regular on the Jimmy Durante show, young scored his own show with Tums as a sponsor. Today he is best known as TV's Wilbur Post, who talked with Mr. Ed the horse.

8:30 pm – 9:00 pm Radio Classics Special Interviews
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Alan Young & Greg Bell Part 1

9:00 pm – 9:30 pm Hollywood Star Playhouse
close Hollywood Star Playhouse

"No Gloom Of Night" from 4/27/1952

9:30 pm – 10:00 pm Radio Classics Special Interviews
close Radio Classics Special Interviews

Alan Young & Greg Bell Part 2

10:00 pm – 11:30 pm Yours Truly, Johnny Dollar
close Yours Truly, Johnny Dollar

"The Alder Matter" from 8/6/1956 Yours Truly, Johnny Dollar told the story of the freelance insurance investigator with the "action-packed expense account." Radio’s last great detective series, Yours Truly, Johnny Dollar ended its run September 30, 1962 during the final week of network radio drama.

11:30 pm – Saturday Midnight Broadway is My Beat
close Broadway is My Beat

"Joan Fuller Murder Case" from 11/17/1950 Broadway Is My Beat debuted over CBS on February 27, 1949 and continued through August 1, 1954. Anthony Ross starred as Clover during the first two seasons, with Thor taking over the role on July 3, 1950. Homicide detective Clover pounded the Broadway beat for five years in one of radio's last great detective series.

Sunday 11/26
12:00 am – 12:30 am Suspense
close Suspense

"Concerto For Killer & Eyewitnesses" from 6/9/1952 Suspense debuted on June 17, 1942 as a sustaining summer replacement, returned that fall and continued in the CBS lineup until September 30, 1962. "Radio's outstanding theatre of thrills" is recognized as one of the finest dramatic series in the history of broadcasting.

12:30 am – 1:00 am The Whistler
close The Whistler

"Broken Chain" from 5/20/1946 The Whistler whistled its way onto the airwaves beginning May 16, 1942 and its eerie 13-note theme set the tone for West Coast radio mystery for the next decade. "I am the Whistler and I know many things, for I walk by night. I know many strange tales hidden in the hearts of men and women who have stepped into the shadows. Yes, I know the nameless terrors of which they dare not speak."

1:00 am – 2:00 am Phil Harris & Alice Faye Show
close Phil Harris & Alice Faye Show

"Elephant For Mr. Scott" from 12/14/1952 --- "New Fire Chief" from 1/30/1949 The Phil Harris & Alice Faye Show grew out of the popular Fitch Bandwagon series. Phil Harris played himself, continuing the egotistical, smart-alec characterization he had perfected during his years as Jack Bennys' bandleader. Alice Faye, Phil's movie star wife, recreated her real-life role as a film star turn devoted housewife.

2:00 am – 3:00 am The Aldrich Family
close The Aldrich Family

"Dinner Date With Kathleen" from 1/20/1949 --- "Shoveling Snow" from 2/3/1949 The character of Henry Aldrich was introduced in Clifford Goldsmith's 1937 play, "What a Life". Ezra Stone originated the role of "America's favorite teenager" on Broadway and portrayed the role for nearly a decade on radio. After being featured in short skits on variety shows, The Aldrich Family debuted as Jack Benny's summer replacement on July 2, 1939. The series moved into its own NBC timeslot on October 10, 1939 and continued until April 19, 1953. Stone received his draft notice in the summer of 1941 but continued as Henry for the next season. Norman Tokar replaced Stone the following season, followed by Dickie Jones and Raymond Ives. After completing his military service in 1945, Stone returned to the role he had originated and was heard as Henry though the early 1950s when Bobby Ellis took over the role on both radio and television.

3:00 am – 3:30 am Martin & Lewis Show
close Martin & Lewis Show

Guest: Laraine Day from 4/28/1953 Comedy/variety show starring Dean Martin and Jerry Lewis.

3:30 am – 4:00 am Danny Kaye Show
close Danny Kaye Show

"First Show with Eddie Cantor" from 1/6/1945 Radio Classics invites you to experience the audio magic of legendary old time radio. RadioClassics features the best dramas, mysteries, comedies, and variety programs from the Golden Age of Radio.

4:00 am – 4:30 am Dark Venture
close Dark Venture

"The Only Inhabitant" from 11/19/1946

4:30 am – 5:00 am The Whistler
close The Whistler

"Evening Stroll" from 2/19/1950 The Whistler whistled its way onto the airwaves beginning May 16, 1942 and its eerie 13-note theme set the tone for West Coast radio mystery for the next decade. "I am the Whistler and I know many things, for I walk by night. I know many strange tales hidden in the hearts of men and women who have stepped into the shadows. Yes, I know the nameless terrors of which they dare not speak."

5:00 am – 6:00 am Charlie McCarthy Show
close Charlie McCarthy Show

Guest: Roger Revelle from 4/15/1956 Ventriloquist Edgar Bergen developed his Charlie McCarthy character in high school. Bergen performed with the newsboy dummy while attending Northwestern University and eventually left college to tour vaudeville. With the decline of vaudeville during the Great Depression, Bergen moved into night spots like New York’s trendy Rainbow Room but feared his friend wouldn’t be appreciated by high society. So he gave Charlie a monocle and top hat and a "man about town" was born. Following a three-month guest stint on Rudy Vallee’s show, Edgar Bergen was signed as headliner of The Chase and Sanborn Hour. The series premiered May 9, 1937 and ended the next three seasons as radio’s top-rated series.

6:00 am – 6:30 am Murder By Experts
close Murder By Experts

"Dig Your Own Grave" from 8/15/1949

6:30 am – 7:00 am Suspense
close Suspense

"The Locked Room" from 1/27/1944 Suspense debuted on June 17, 1942 as a sustaining summer replacement, returned that fall and continued in the CBS lineup until September 30, 1962. "Radio's outstanding theatre of thrills" is recognized as one of the finest dramatic series in the history of broadcasting.

7:00 am – 7:30 am Murder By Experts
close Murder By Experts

"Return Trip" from 9/5/1949

7:30 am – 8:00 am Suspense
close Suspense

"Make A Bet With Death?" from 11/10/1942 Suspense debuted on June 17, 1942 as a sustaining summer replacement, returned that fall and continued in the CBS lineup until September 30, 1962. "Radio's outstanding theatre of thrills" is recognized as one of the finest dramatic series in the history of broadcasting.

8:00 am – 8:30 am Radio Classics
close Radio Classics

"Gregory Hood, Suspect" from 9/20/1946 Radio Classics invites you to experience the audio magic of legendary old time radio. RadioClassics features the best dramas, mysteries, comedies, and variety programs from the Golden Age of Radio.

8:30 am – 9:00 am Voyage of the Scarlet Queen
close Voyage of the Scarlet Queen

"Wandering Master & Warlord At Rest" from 12/10/1947

9:00 am – 9:30 am Crime Classics
close Crime Classics

"Madeline Smith Maid Or Murderess" from 1/20/1954 Crime Classics featured "true crime stories from the records and newspapers of every land from every time" culled from director Elliott Lewis' voluminous personal library of true crime cases. The CBS series ran from June 15, 1953 through June 30, 1954.

9:30 am – 10:00 am The Unexpected
close The Unexpected

"Eavesdropper" from 6/20/1948 These frightening tales always ended with - you guessed it - an unexpected twist. Barry Sullivan, Virginia Gregg, and Lurene Tuttle appeared in this syndicated series in 1948.

10:00 am – 11:00 am Jack Benny Program
close Jack Benny Program

"Murder On The Grid Iron Week 1" from 12/3/1939 --- "Murder On The Grid Iron Week 2" from 12/10/1939 For more than 20 years, Jack Benny reigned as the king of radio comedy. His show ran on nearly every network from 1932 to the mid 1950s. How he turned a miserable, self-absorbed cheapskate into a beloved icon ranks among the great achievements in entertainment history. Benny revolutionized the way humor was played on radio by introducing the situation comedy and by giving most of the best lines to his supporting cast.

11:00 am – 11:30 am The Green Hornet
close The Green Hornet

"Corpse That Wasn't There" from 2/28/1943 The Green Hornet debuted in Detroit on January 31, 1936. The Green Hornet was well-served by his valet Kato and a supercharged roadster, the Black Beauty. Al Hodge portrayed The Green Hornet during the series' first seven seasons, followed by Donovan Faust, Robert Hall and Jack McCarthy. The show ran on radio through December 5, 1952.

11:30 am – 12:00 pm Wild Bill Hickok
close Wild Bill Hickok

"Secret Of Arroyo Diablo" from 8/26/1951 This children's western series aired on Mutual from May 1951 - February 1956. Guy Madison starred as Marshall Wild Bill Hickok with Andy Devine as his sidekick Jingles. Each week, the pair encounters a gang of troublemakers along the trail and have it out in a battle of good guys Vs. bad guys.

12:00 pm – 1:30 pm Adventures of Nero Wolfe
close Adventures of Nero Wolfe

"Case Of The Careworn Cuff" from 10/27/1950 --- "Case Of The Friendly Rabbit" from 12/1/1950 --- "Case Of The Final Page" from 3/23/1 Nero Wolfe solved crimes with an attention to detail that rivaled the great Sherlock Holmes, although the overweight detective physically resembled Holmes' obese older brother Mycroft. The adventures of Rex Stouts's "gargantuan gourmet" first came to radio over the New England Network beginning April 7, 1943. The series moved onto the Blue Network on July 5, 1943 starring Santos Ortega and later Luis Van Rooten.

1:30 pm – 2:00 pm Frontier Fighters
close Frontier Fighters

"Zebulon Pike" from 1935 This series consisted of episodes about true historical adventures in the American West. Some of the stories include Lewis & Clark, the Oregon boundary dispute, and the purchase of Alaska. The original broadcast dates for Frontier Fighters are still unclear; the series ran sometime during the 1930s.

2:00 pm – 3:00 pm X Minus One
close X Minus One

"Target One" from 12/26/1957 --- "The Moon Is Green" from 1/2/1957 X-Minus One premiered on April 24, 195 and was a revival of Dimension X, NBC's earlier science fiction anthology series. X-Minus One ran until January 9, 1958 and was rerun during the 1970s as part of NBC's Omnibus series.

3:00 pm – 3:30 pm CBS Radio Workshop
close CBS Radio Workshop

"The Endless Road" from 3/17/1957 The CBS Radio Workshop aired from January 27, 1956 through September 22, 1957 and was a revival of the prestigious Columbia Workshop from the 1930s and 1940s. The CBS Workshop regularly featured the works of the world’s greatest writers. including Ray Bradbury, Archibald MacLeish, William Saroyan, Lord Dunsany and Ambrose Bierce.

3:30 pm – 4:00 pm True Detective Mysteries
close True Detective Mysteries

"Dream Of Richard Lauber" from 12/23/1947 Radio Classics invites you to experience the audio magic of legendary old time radio. RadioClassics features the best dramas, mysteries, comedies, and variety programs from the Golden Age of Radio.

4:00 pm – 4:30 pm Our Miss Brooks
close Our Miss Brooks

"Arguments, Arguments!" from 5/29/1949 Eve Arden portrays Miss Connie Brooks, an overworked and underpaid teacher of 10th grade English at Madison High School. Our Miss Brooks called her radio classroom to order beginning July 19, 1948. The final bell rang for Our Miss Brooks on July 7, 1957.

4:30 pm – 5:30 pm Great Gildersleeve
close Great Gildersleeve

"Engagement Notices" from 1/4/1950 --- "Bronco Runs The Household" from 3/21/1951 The Great Gildersleeve featured one of radio’s greatest casts of comedic players. The Great Gildersleeve aired until March 21, 1957, with Willard Waterman taking over the title role for the final seven radio season and three television seasons.

5:30 pm – 6:00 pm A Date With Judy
close A Date With Judy

Guest: Joseph Cotten from 2/6/1945 Fourteen-year-old Ann Gillis starred in the 1941 series, and Dellie Ellis starred in the 1942 version. Louise Erickson (who had played Judy’s friend Mitzi opposite Ellis) made the title role her own in a 1943 summer series and starred in the regular program from 1944-49. Judy's father Melvyn was the owner of the Foster Can Company, and her mother was a typical housewife. Judy also had a brother Randolph, a boyfriend Oogie and plenty of friends.

6:00 pm – 7:00 pm When Radio Was
close When Radio Was

Radio Spirits' nationally syndicated radio program hosted by old-time radio expert Greg Bell

7:00 pm – 7:30 pm Yours Truly, Johnny Dollar
close Yours Truly, Johnny Dollar

"Expiring Nickels & Egyptian Jacket" from 9/4/1949 Yours Truly, Johnny Dollar told the story of the freelance insurance investigator with the "action-packed expense account." Radio’s last great detective series, Yours Truly, Johnny Dollar ended its run September 30, 1962 during the final week of network radio drama.

7:30 pm – 8:00 pm The Saint
close The Saint

"Dossier On A Damsel In Distress" from 8/20/1950 Radio Classics invites you to experience the audio magic of legendary old time radio. RadioClassics features the best dramas, mysteries, comedies, and variety programs from the Golden Age of Radio.

8:00 pm – 8:30 pm The Green Hornet
close The Green Hornet

"Dope Vs The War Effort" from 6/20/1949 The Green Hornet debuted in Detroit on January 31, 1936. The Green Hornet was well-served by his valet Kato and a supercharged roadster, the Black Beauty. Al Hodge portrayed The Green Hornet during the series' first seven seasons, followed by Donovan Faust, Robert Hall and Jack McCarthy. The show ran on radio through December 5, 1952.

8:30 pm – 9:00 pm Boston Blackie
close Boston Blackie

"The Escaped Prisoner" from 5/28/1946 Boston Blackie was created by Jack Boyle, a hard-drinking opium addict who served three prison terms. While in prison, Boyle began writing true-crime confession stories that were published in The American Magazine under the byline 6006, his convict number. Boyle's stories were collected in his 1919 book, Boston Blackie, and inspired a popular series of B-films, the radio series and a 1951 video version.

9:00 pm – 9:30 pm The Weird Circle
close The Weird Circle

"Passion In The Desert" from 11/7/1943 This horror series consisted mostly of adapted supernatural tales from greats like Edgar Allen Poe and Robert Louis Stevenson. It aired for two seasons from 1943-1945, first on Mutual and then on NBC's Red network.

9:30 pm – 10:00 pm Red Skelton Show
close Red Skelton Show

"Going On Vacation" from 5/27/1949 The Red Skelton Show came to NBC on October 7, 1941 after years as a mainstay on Cincinnati's powerhouse station WLW. Red scored with radio audiences as Junior, "the mean widdle kid," a character he originated in vaudeville. Some of his other memorable characters included Deadeye, J. Newton Numbskull, Willie Lump-Lump, Bolivar Shagnasty and Clem Kadiddlehopper.

10:00 pm – 11:00 pm The Ford Theater
close The Ford Theater

"Connecticut Yankee In King Arthur's Court" from 10/5/1947 Radio Classics invites you to experience the audio magic of legendary old time radio. RadioClassics features the best dramas, mysteries, comedies, and variety programs from the Golden Age of Radio.

11:00 pm – 11:30 pm CBS Radio Workshop
close CBS Radio Workshop

"Roughin It (Mark Twain)" from 10/5/1956 The CBS Radio Workshop aired from January 27, 1956 through September 22, 1957 and was a revival of the prestigious Columbia Workshop from the 1930s and 1940s. The CBS Workshop regularly featured the works of the world’s greatest writers. including Ray Bradbury, Archibald MacLeish, William Saroyan, Lord Dunsany and Ambrose Bierce.

11:30 pm – Sunday Midnight Frontier Fighters
close Frontier Fighters

"Thomas Starr King" from 1935 This series consisted of episodes about true historical adventures in the American West. Some of the stories include Lewis & Clark, the Oregon boundary dispute, and the purchase of Alaska. The original broadcast dates for Frontier Fighters are still unclear; the series ran sometime during the 1930s.

Monday 11/27
12:00 am – 12:30 am Mr. & Mrs. North
close Mr. & Mrs. North

"Runaway From Murder" from 10/27/1953 This mystery series aired on NBC and CBS from 1942 to 1954, originally starring Alice Frost and Joseph Curtin. The title characters were a married couple of amateur detectives who somehow always managed to solve crimes that stumped professional police and detectives.

12:30 am – 1:00 am Gangbusters
close Gangbusters

"High School Hotshots" from 4/10/1948 Gangbusters first came to radio under the title G-Men beginning July 20, 1935. The long-running series was created by Philip H. Lord and produced "in cooperation with police and federal law enforcement departments throughout the U.S. Gangbusters was one of radio's longest-running dramatic series, running from January 15, 1936 through November 27, 1957, and its classic opening gave rise to the expression "coming on like gangbusters."

1:00 am – 1:30 am Further Adventures of Sherlock Holmes
close Further Adventures of Sherlock Holmes

"The Lion's Mane" from 10/18/2009 Jim French wrote this modern adaptation of mystery's most famous detective as part of the Imagination Theatre productions. These plays were produced and aired in the '00s. John Patrick Lowrie plays Holmes and Lawrence Albert portrays Watson.

1:30 am – 2:00 am Have Gun, Will Travel
close Have Gun, Will Travel

"Homecoming" from 6/28/2009 Have Gun, Will Travel debuted on television on September 14, 1957 and moved to radio November 23, 1958. The program was an oddity, a western that began on television and moved to radio, featuring an ethical anti-hero whose mysterious origins were left untold until the fifth and final TV season.

2:00 am – 2:30 am Escape - Radio Classics
close Escape - Radio Classics

"The Island" from 7/11/1951 Radio's greatest series of high adventure debuted over the CBS network on July 7,1947. Escape's protagonists faced life-and-death situations each week, as the show careened from classic adventure to Western drama to science fiction. The program was broadcast as a sustainer (unsponsored) series during most of its seven-year run.

2:30 am – 3:00 am Suspense
close Suspense

"On A Country Road" from 12/9/1954 Suspense debuted on June 17, 1942 as a sustaining summer replacement, returned that fall and continued in the CBS lineup until September 30, 1962. "Radio's outstanding theatre of thrills" is recognized as one of the finest dramatic series in the history of broadcasting.

3:00 am – 3:30 am Gunsmoke
close Gunsmoke

"Cain" from 10/3/1952 Radio’s greatest adult western told the story of Matt Dillon, U.S. Marshal, "the first man they look for and the last they want to meet." Gunsmoke grew out of a request from CBS founder William Paley for a "Philip Marlowe in the Old West," and featured grimly realistic stories set in the vicinity of Dodge City, the "Gommorrah of the West," with William Conrad as Dillon.

3:30 am – 4:00 am The Six Shooter
close The Six Shooter

"Jenny" from 9/20/1953 The Six Shooter aired started movie star James Stewart rode the radio range from September 20, 1953 through June 24, 1954 as Britt Ponset, "the Texas plainsman who wandered through the western territories, leaving behind a trail of still-remembered legends."

4:00 am – 4:30 am Let George Do It
close Let George Do It

"Serenade To The Southern Star" from 6/13/1949 Let George Do It stars Bob Bailey as George Valentine, a detective whose cases came from the newspaper.

4:30 am – 5:00 am The Fat Man
close The Fat Man

"19th Pearl (Debut Episode)" from 1/21/1946 The Fat Man was a detective series based on a character created by Dashiell Hammett. The show aired on ABC from 1946 to 1951. J. Scott Smart starred as Brad Runyon, a portly, powerful and witty detective.

5:00 am – 5:30 am I Was A Communist for the FBI
close I Was A Communist for the FBI

"The Unwelcome Hosts" from 10/6/1952 I Was a Communist for the FBI--I walk alone. The 1952 syndicated series starred Dana Andrews as real-life undercover agent Matt Cvetic, whose book of the same title provided the inspiration for the radio series and a Hollywood film. Growing out of the communist paranoia of the McCarthy era, the Cold War drama featured red spies portrayed in the same stereotypical manner of the Nazis during World Ward II propaganda programs.

5:30 am – 6:00 am Have Gun, Will Travel
close Have Gun, Will Travel

"Finn Alley" from 8/9/1959 Have Gun, Will Travel debuted on television on September 14, 1957 and moved to radio November 23, 1958. The program was an oddity, a western that began on television and moved to radio, featuring an ethical anti-hero whose mysterious origins were left untold until the fifth and final TV season.

6:00 am – 6:30 am Escape - Radio Classics
close Escape - Radio Classics

"Occurrence On Owl Creek Bridge" from 12/10/1947 Radio's greatest series of high adventure debuted over the CBS network on July 7,1947. Escape's protagonists faced life-and-death situations each week, as the show careened from classic adventure to Western drama to science fiction. The program was broadcast as a sustainer (unsponsored) series during most of its seven-year run.

6:30 am – 7:30 am Suspense
close Suspense

"To None A Deadly Drug" from 10/25/1955 Suspense debuted on June 17, 1942 as a sustaining summer replacement, returned that fall and continued in the CBS lineup until September 30, 1962. "Radio's outstanding theatre of thrills" is recognized as one of the finest dramatic series in the history of broadcasting.

7:30 am – 8:00 am Gunsmoke
close Gunsmoke

"Bureaucrat" from 1/29/1956 Radio’s greatest adult western told the story of Matt Dillon, U.S. Marshal, "the first man they look for and the last they want to meet." Gunsmoke grew out of a request from CBS founder William Paley for a "Philip Marlowe in the Old West," and featured grimly realistic stories set in the vicinity of Dodge City, the "Gommorrah of the West," with William Conrad as Dillon.

8:00 am – 8:30 am Jack Benny Program
close Jack Benny Program

"Waiting To See Movie Director" from 11/17/1940 For more than 20 years, Jack Benny reigned as the king of radio comedy. His show ran on nearly every network from 1932 to the mid 1950s. How he turned a miserable, self-absorbed cheapskate into a beloved icon ranks among the great achievements in entertainment history. Benny revolutionized the way humor was played on radio by introducing the situation comedy and by giving most of the best lines to his supporting cast.

8:30 am – 9:00 am Burns & Allen Show
close Burns & Allen Show

"George's Wrestling Match" from 3/21/1946 George and Gracie first performed on air over the BBC while touring England after an NBC executive rejected their act insisting that "Gracie’s voice is unfit for radio." Burns and Allen won a regular spot on The Robert Burns Panatella Program February 22, 1932 and moved into the top spot when Guy Lombardo left the series. The Burns and Allen Show aired through May 17, 1950 on radio and for another decade on television. Jack Benny and George Burns were best friends in real life and often were guests on each other’s programs.

9:00 am – 9:30 am The Green Hornet
close The Green Hornet

"Money Talks Too Loud" from 6/30/1939 The Green Hornet debuted in Detroit on January 31, 1936. The Green Hornet was well-served by his valet Kato and a supercharged roadster, the Black Beauty. Al Hodge portrayed The Green Hornet during the series' first seven seasons, followed by Donovan Faust, Robert Hall and Jack McCarthy. The show ran on radio through December 5, 1952.

9:30 am – 10:00 am The Shadow
close The Shadow

"The Poison Death" from 1/30/1938 The Shadow debuted July 31, 1930 as the sinister narrator of CBS’ Street & Smith’s Detective Story Hour. The popularity of the phantom host led the nation’s largest publisher of pulp fiction to launch a mystery magazine devoted to The Shadow’s adventures.

10:00 am – 11:00 am Yours Truly, Johnny Dollar
close Yours Truly, Johnny Dollar

"Chesapeake Fraud Matter" from 10/21/1955 Yours Truly, Johnny Dollar told the story of the freelance insurance investigator with the "action-packed expense account." Radio’s last great detective series, Yours Truly, Johnny Dollar ended its run September 30, 1962 during the final week of network radio drama.

11:00 am – 11:30 am Charlie McCarthy Show
close Charlie McCarthy Show

Guest: Ann Blyth from 4/25/1954 Ventriloquist Edgar Bergen developed his Charlie McCarthy character in high school. Bergen performed with the newsboy dummy while attending Northwestern University and eventually left college to tour vaudeville. With the decline of vaudeville during the Great Depression, Bergen moved into night spots like New York’s trendy Rainbow Room but feared his friend wouldn’t be appreciated by high society. So he gave Charlie a monocle and top hat and a "man about town" was born. Following a three-month guest stint on Rudy Vallee’s show, Edgar Bergen was signed as headliner of The Chase and Sanborn Hour. The series premiered May 9, 1937 and ended the next three seasons as radio’s top-rated series.

11:30 am – 12:00 pm The Couple Next Door
close The Couple Next Door

"Explaining The Facts Of Life" from 1/24/1958 This serialized comedy-drama aired first in the mid 1930s and was later revived in 1957 with Peg Lynch and Alan Bunce playing their characters from Ethel & Albert. Peg Lynch wrote every episode of this 15-minute CBS series from 1957-1960.

12:00 pm – 1:00 pm When Radio Was
close When Radio Was

Radio Spirits' nationally syndicated radio program hosted by old-time radio expert Greg Bell

1:00 pm – 1:30 pm The Whistler
close The Whistler

"Murder Of Byron Blake" from 3/10/1947 The Whistler whistled its way onto the airwaves beginning May 16, 1942 and its eerie 13-note theme set the tone for West Coast radio mystery for the next decade. "I am the Whistler and I know many things, for I walk by night. I know many strange tales hidden in the hearts of men and women who have stepped into the shadows. Yes, I know the nameless terrors of which they dare not speak."

1:30 pm – 2:00 pm Yours Truly, Johnny Dollar
close Yours Truly, Johnny Dollar

"Yankee Pride Matter" from 10/14/1950 Yours Truly, Johnny Dollar told the story of the freelance insurance investigator with the "action-packed expense account." Radio’s last great detective series, Yours Truly, Johnny Dollar ended its run September 30, 1962 during the final week of network radio drama.

2:00 pm – 2:30 pm Strange Wills
close Strange Wills

"Black Interlude" from 6/22/1946 Radio Classics invites you to experience the audio magic of legendary old time radio. RadioClassics features the best dramas, mysteries, comedies, and variety programs from the Golden Age of Radio.

2:30 pm – 3:00 pm Suspense
close Suspense

"Murder Goes For A Swim" from 7/7/1943 Suspense debuted on June 17, 1942 as a sustaining summer replacement, returned that fall and continued in the CBS lineup until September 30, 1962. "Radio's outstanding theatre of thrills" is recognized as one of the finest dramatic series in the history of broadcasting.

3:00 pm – 3:30 pm Michael Shayne
close Michael Shayne

"Case Of The Phantom Neighbor" from 1/8/1949 Detective Michael Shayne was created by Davis Dresser (writing under the pen name Brett Halliday). "Dividend of Death," the first of more than 60 novels featuring the Miami-based private detective was published in 1939. The adventures of the "reckless red-headed Irishman," played by Wally Maher, came to radio October 16, 1944 and aired for 3 years.

3:30 pm – 4:00 pm Man Called X
close Man Called X

"Chasing A Dead Agent" from 5/11/1951 Wherever there is mystery, adventure, intrigue, in all the strange and dangerous places in the world, there you will find--The Man Called X! Debonair British actor Herbert Marshall stars as FBI agent Ken Thurston, "the man who crosses the ocean as readily as you and I cross town; he is the man who fights today's war in his unique fashion, so that tomorrow's peace will make the world a neighborhood for all of us." The Man Called X debuted over CBS on July 10, 1944, moved to NBC in 1950 and continued through May 20, 1952.

4:00 pm – 4:30 pm Charlie McCarthy Show
close Charlie McCarthy Show

Guest: Anne Baxter from 3/4/1945 Ventriloquist Edgar Bergen developed his Charlie McCarthy character in high school. Bergen performed with the newsboy dummy while attending Northwestern University and eventually left college to tour vaudeville. With the decline of vaudeville during the Great Depression, Bergen moved into night spots like New York’s trendy Rainbow Room but feared his friend wouldn’t be appreciated by high society. So he gave Charlie a monocle and top hat and a "man about town" was born. Following a three-month guest stint on Rudy Vallee’s show, Edgar Bergen was signed as headliner of The Chase and Sanborn Hour. The series premiered May 9, 1937 and ended the next three seasons as radio’s top-rated series.

4:30 pm – 5:00 pm Behind The Mike
close Behind The Mike

"Script Writers" from 6/12/1941 "Radio's own show" first ran in 1931 as a 15-minute show, then revamped in 1940 as a half-hour program, hosted by Graham McNamee. Episodes could feature interviews with inventors, producers, show runners and actors, sharing behind-the-scenes stories of how radio shows get made.

5:00 pm – 5:30 pm Crime Classics
close Crime Classics

"Good Ship Jane" from 2/24/1954 Crime Classics featured "true crime stories from the records and newspapers of every land from every time" culled from director Elliott Lewis' voluminous personal library of true crime cases. The CBS series ran from June 15, 1953 through June 30, 1954.

5:30 pm – 6:00 pm Cavalcade of America
close Cavalcade of America

"A Case For The FBI" from 4/15/1943 The Cavalcade of America was a historical dramatic anthology and aired from 1935 to 1953. Patriotic in nature, this series was created in part to improve the name of sponsor DuPont Chemical, which received backlash for profiting enormously from War World I. The show's themes were never voilent, but rather idealistic. Stories included the voyage of the Mayflower, the first telegraph, and Eli Whitney's cotton gin.

6:00 pm – 6:30 pm Candy Matson
close Candy Matson

"Eric Spaulding Concert" from 2/13/1950 Candy Matson was a hard-as-nails private eye played by Natalie Masters. The show, set in San Francisco, was on the air from 1941 to 1942.

6:30 pm – 7:00 pm The Saint
close The Saint

"The Follow The Leader" from 7/16/1950 Radio Classics invites you to experience the audio magic of legendary old time radio. RadioClassics features the best dramas, mysteries, comedies, and variety programs from the Golden Age of Radio.

7:00 pm – 7:30 pm Danny Kaye Show
close Danny Kaye Show

"Teaching Old Dog New Tricks" from 2/17/1945 Radio Classics invites you to experience the audio magic of legendary old time radio. RadioClassics features the best dramas, mysteries, comedies, and variety programs from the Golden Age of Radio.

7:30 pm – 8:00 pm Lum and Abner
close Lum and Abner

"Minding The Jail" from 8/19/1943 Chester Lauck and Norris Goff were first heard as Lum and Abner on a radio fundraiser for flood victims. Improvising the spot, they went on the air as the "fellers from the hills" and won a regular spot on KTHS beginning April 26, 1931. Lum and Abner moved into an NBC summer berth July 27, 1931 and aired nationally from May 22, 1933 through May 7, 1954.

8:00 pm – 9:00 pm First Nighter Program
close First Nighter Program

"Love Is Stranger Than Fiction" from 2/12/1948 --- "Chinese Gong" from 3/29/1954 Radio Classics invites you to experience the audio magic of legendary old time radio. RadioClassics features the best dramas, mysteries, comedies, and variety programs from the Golden Age of Radio.

9:00 pm – 9:30 pm Damon Runyon Theatre
close Damon Runyon Theatre

"Neat Strip" from 12/11/1949 This anthology series dramatized the stories of fiction author Damon Runyon and aired in various forms from the late 1940s to the mid 1950s. John Brown starred as "Broadway," a fluent "Brooklynese" speaker who spun tales of old Manhattan.

9:30 pm – 10:00 pm CBS Radio Workshop
close CBS Radio Workshop

"I Have Three Heads" from 5/26/1957 The CBS Radio Workshop aired from January 27, 1956 through September 22, 1957 and was a revival of the prestigious Columbia Workshop from the 1930s and 1940s. The CBS Workshop regularly featured the works of the world’s greatest writers. including Ray Bradbury, Archibald MacLeish, William Saroyan, Lord Dunsany and Ambrose Bierce.

10:00 pm – 11:00 pm Mercury Theatre On The Air
close Mercury Theatre On The Air

"Hell On Ice" from 10/9/1938 Created by Orson Welles, this weekly hour-long show presented classic literary works. The series debuted on CBS on July 11, 1938. After the renown (and accidental panic) of "The War of the Worlds", which aired about 6 months after the series began, Campbell's Soup signed on as the sponser and the show became the Campbell Playhouse.

11:00 pm – 11:30 pm Gunsmoke
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"Little Bird" from 5/11/1958 Radio’s greatest adult western told the story of Matt Dillon, U.S. Marshal, "the first man they look for and the last they want to meet." Gunsmoke grew out of a request from CBS founder William Paley for a "Philip Marlowe in the Old West," and featured grimly realistic stories set in the vicinity of Dodge City, the "Gommorrah of the West," with William Conrad as Dillon.

11:30 pm – Monday Midnight Have Gun, Will Travel
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"Killer's Widow" from 2/8/1959 Have Gun, Will Travel debuted on television on September 14, 1957 and moved to radio November 23, 1958. The program was an oddity, a western that began on television and moved to radio, featuring an ethical anti-hero whose mysterious origins were left untold until the fifth and final TV season.

Tuesday 11/28
12:00 am – 12:30 am Our Miss Brooks
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"Burial Grounds" from 11/5/1950 Eve Arden portrays Miss Connie Brooks, an overworked and underpaid teacher of 10th grade English at Madison High School. Our Miss Brooks called her radio classroom to order beginning July 19, 1948. The final bell rang for Our Miss Brooks on July 7, 1957.

12:30 am – 1:00 am The Aldrich Family
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"Henry Is A Shortstop" from 4/14/1949 The character of Henry Aldrich was introduced in Clifford Goldsmith's 1937 play, "What a Life". Ezra Stone originated the role of "America's favorite teenager" on Broadway and portrayed the role for nearly a decade on radio. After being featured in short skits on variety shows, The Aldrich Family debuted as Jack Benny's summer replacement on July 2, 1939. The series moved into its own NBC timeslot on October 10, 1939 and continued until April 19, 1953. Stone received his draft notice in the summer of 1941 but continued as Henry for the next season. Norman Tokar replaced Stone the following season, followed by Dickie Jones and Raymond Ives. After completing his military service in 1945, Stone returned to the role he had originated and was heard as Henry though the early 1950s when Bobby Ellis took over the role on both radio and television.

1:00 am – 1:30 am Sherlock Holmes
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"Case Of The Stolen Naval Treaty" from 11/23/1947 Based on the popular characters created by Sir Arthur Conan Doyle, The Adventures of Sherlock Holmes began on coast-to-coast CBS radio in 1930. By the late 1930s The Adventures of Sherlock Holmes had moved to the Mutual Broadcasting Network and the series was forced to rely on invented new adventures, having run out of Doyle stories to adapt.

1:30 am – 2:00 am Richard Diamond, Private Detective
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"Mona Lisa Murder Case" from 7/26/1953 Richard Diamond, Private Detective premiered over the NBC network on April 24, 1949 and ran through 1952 starring Dick Powell as "radio's singing detective." Powell had first achieved movie stardom as a baby-faced crooner, and later matured to hardboiled roles, including Raymond Chandler's Philip Marlowe in the 1944 film Murder My Sweet.

2:00 am – 2:30 am Fort Laramie
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"A Small Beginning" from 9/30/1956 Specially transcribed tales of the dark and tragic ground of the wild frontier. The saga of fighting men who rode the rim of empire and the dramatic story of Lee Quince, Captain of Cavalry. Premiering in January 1956, Raymond Burr starred as Captain Quince-a soldier who followed orders and a leader who lived by his own rules of fairness and honesty.

2:30 am – 3:00 am Wild Bill Hickok
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"Fury Of Savage River" from 9/30/1951 This children's western series aired on Mutual from May 1951 - February 1956. Guy Madison starred as Marshall Wild Bill Hickok with Andy Devine as his sidekick Jingles. Each week, the pair encounters a gang of troublemakers along the trail and have it out in a battle of good guys Vs. bad guys.

3:00 am – 3:30 am Adventures of Harry Nile
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"Source Alpha" from 7/13/2008 This series is one of a few modern series featured by Radio Classics. A creation of writer Jim French, Harry Nile first came to radio in 1976 and continued to be adapted into the late '90s as part of the "Imagination Theatre" productions. Harry Nile, a former Chicago cop turned private detective, was played by Phil Harper for more than 20 years.

3:30 am – 4:00 am Gangbusters
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"Appointment With Death" from 12/18/1948 Gangbusters first came to radio under the title G-Men beginning July 20, 1935. The long-running series was created by Philip H. Lord and produced "in cooperation with police and federal law enforcement departments throughout the U.S. Gangbusters was one of radio's longest-running dramatic series, running from January 15, 1936 through November 27, 1957, and its classic opening gave rise to the expression "coming on like gangbusters."

4:00 am – 5:00 am The Ford Theater
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"Connecticut Yankee In King Arthur's Court" from 10/5/1947 Radio Classics invites you to experience the audio magic of legendary old time radio. RadioClassics features the best dramas, mysteries, comedies, and variety programs from the Golden Age of Radio.

5:00 am – 5:30 am CBS Radio Workshop
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"Roughin It (Mark Twain)" from 10/5/1956 The CBS Radio Workshop aired from January 27, 1956 through September 22, 1957 and was a revival of the prestigious Columbia Workshop from the 1930s and 1940s. The CBS Workshop regularly featured the works of the world’s greatest writers. including Ray Bradbury, Archibald MacLeish, William Saroyan, Lord Dunsany and Ambrose Bierce.

5:30 am – 6:00 am Frontier Fighters
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"Thomas Starr King" from 1935 This series consisted of episodes about true historical adventures in the American West. Some of the stories include Lewis & Clark, the Oregon boundary dispute, and the purchase of Alaska. The original broadcast dates for Frontier Fighters are still unclear; the series ran sometime during the 1930s.

6:00 am – 6:30 am The Shadow
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"Murder At Dead Man's Inn" from 9/12/1948 The Shadow debuted July 31, 1930 as the sinister narrator of CBS’ Street & Smith’s Detective Story Hour. The popularity of the phantom host led the nation’s largest publisher of pulp fiction to launch a mystery magazine devoted to The Shadow’s adventures.

6:30 am – 7:00 am The Whistler
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"The Stray Dream" from 11/26/1945 The Whistler whistled its way onto the airwaves beginning May 16, 1942 and its eerie 13-note theme set the tone for West Coast radio mystery for the next decade. "I am the Whistler and I know many things, for I walk by night. I know many strange tales hidden in the hearts of men and women who have stepped into the shadows. Yes, I know the nameless terrors of which they dare not speak."

7:00 am – 7:30 am Phil Harris & Alice Faye Show
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"Pebble Beach Golf Trip" from 1/6/1952 The Phil Harris & Alice Faye Show grew out of the popular Fitch Bandwagon series. Phil Harris played himself, continuing the egotistical, smart-alec characterization he had perfected during his years as Jack Bennys' bandleader. Alice Faye, Phil's movie star wife, recreated her real-life role as a film star turn devoted housewife.

7:30 am – 8:00 am Fibber McGee & Molly
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"Fishing Trip" from 6/30/1953 The husband-and-wife vaudeville team of Jim and Marian Jordan began their radio careers in Peoria on a bet from Jim’s brother. The Jordans were heard as The O’Henry Twins and The Air Scouts before Don Quinn created Smackout in 1931. Quinn revamped the show as Fibber McGee and Molly in 1935 when Johnson’s Wax signed on as sponsor.

8:00 am – 8:30 am Our Miss Brooks
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"Arguments, Arguments!" from 5/29/1949 Eve Arden portrays Miss Connie Brooks, an overworked and underpaid teacher of 10th grade English at Madison High School. Our Miss Brooks called her radio classroom to order beginning July 19, 1948. The final bell rang for Our Miss Brooks on July 7, 1957.

8:30 am – 9:30 am Great Gildersleeve
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"Engagement Notices" from 1/4/1950 --- "Bronco Runs The Household" from 3/21/1951 The Great Gildersleeve featured one of radio’s greatest casts of comedic players. The Great Gildersleeve aired until March 21, 1957, with Willard Waterman taking over the title role for the final seven radio season and three television seasons.

9:30 am – 10:00 am A Date With Judy
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Guest: Joseph Cotten from 2/6/1945 Fourteen-year-old Ann Gillis starred in the 1941 series, and Dellie Ellis starred in the 1942 version. Louise Erickson (who had played Judy’s friend Mitzi opposite Ellis) made the title role her own in a 1943 summer series and starred in the regular program from 1944-49. Judy's father Melvyn was the owner of the Foster Can Company, and her mother was a typical housewife. Judy also had a brother Randolph, a boyfriend Oogie and plenty of friends.

10:00 am – 10:30 am The Green Hornet
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"Dope Vs The War Effort" from 6/20/1949 The Green Hornet debuted in Detroit on January 31, 1936. The Green Hornet was well-served by his valet Kato and a supercharged roadster, the Black Beauty. Al Hodge portrayed The Green Hornet during the series' first seven seasons, followed by Donovan Faust, Robert Hall and Jack McCarthy. The show ran on radio through December 5, 1952.

10:30 am – 11:00 am Boston Blackie
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"The Escaped Prisoner" from 5/28/1946 Boston Blackie was created by Jack Boyle, a hard-drinking opium addict who served three prison terms. While in prison, Boyle began writing true-crime confession stories that were published in The American Magazine under the byline 6006, his convict number. Boyle's stories were collected in his 1919 book, Boston Blackie, and inspired a popular series of B-films, the radio series and a 1951 video version.

11:00 am – 11:30 am The Weird Circle
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"Passion In The Desert" from 11/7/1943 This horror series consisted mostly of adapted supernatural tales from greats like Edgar Allen Poe and Robert Louis Stevenson. It aired for two seasons from 1943-1945, first on Mutual and then on NBC's Red network.

11:30 am – 12:00 pm Red Skelton Show
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"Going On Vacation" from 5/27/1949 The Red Skelton Show came to NBC on October 7, 1941 after years as a mainstay on Cincinnati's powerhouse station WLW. Red scored with radio audiences as Junior, "the mean widdle kid," a character he originated in vaudeville. Some of his other memorable characters included Deadeye, J. Newton Numbskull, Willie Lump-Lump, Bolivar Shagnasty and Clem Kadiddlehopper.

12:00 pm – 1:00 pm When Radio Was
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Radio Spirits' nationally syndicated radio program hosted by old-time radio expert Greg Bell

1:00 pm – 1:30 pm The Chase
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"Harry and The Talking Horse" from 6/28/1953 This NBC thriller ran for about a year from the spring of 1952 to the summer of 1953. Each unique story entails suspense, action and, of course, a protagonist on the run. The series often featured guest stars who were announcers or actors for other suspenseful series, and many of the scripts were also used in other dramas like The Clock and Inner Sanctum Mysteries.

1:30 pm – 2:00 pm Broadway is My Beat
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"Anna Compton Case" from 9/15/1951 Broadway Is My Beat debuted over CBS on February 27, 1949 and continued through August 1, 1954. Anthony Ross starred as Clover during the first two seasons, with Thor taking over the role on July 3, 1950. Homicide detective Clover pounded the Broadway beat for five years in one of radio's last great detective series.

2:00 pm – 2:30 pm Big Town
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"Lost and Found" from 12/1/1948 Edward G. Robinson starred as crusading newspaper editor Steve Wilson from October 19, 1937 through July 2, 1942. The Hollywood great was glad to play an idealistic role in contrast to his many film gangster portrayals. Big Town at its peak was radio’s highest-rated drama and was only eclipsed by The Jack Benny Program in ratings. The series was canceled when Edward G. Robinson quit in 1942 but was resurrected the following year with Edward Pawley (and later Walter Greaza) as Wilson and Fran Carlon as Lorelei. The revived Big Town aired from October 5, 1943 through June 25, 1952.

2:30 pm – 3:00 pm The Green Hornet
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"Dr. Moylan's Patient" from 5/21/1946 The Green Hornet debuted in Detroit on January 31, 1936. The Green Hornet was well-served by his valet Kato and a supercharged roadster, the Black Beauty. Al Hodge portrayed The Green Hornet during the series' first seven seasons, followed by Donovan Faust, Robert Hall and Jack McCarthy. The show ran on radio through December 5, 1952.

3:00 pm – 3:30 pm Chandu, The Magician
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"Village Of Thieves" from 2/10/1949 This kids' adventure series followed the adventures of Frank Chandler, who used supernatural powers and the occult to fight his evil villian Roxor. His adventures took the audience to exotic lands, real and imagined, in the Middle East. The show first ran in the early 1930s and was later revived in the late 1950s

3:30 pm – 4:00 pm The Hermit's Cave
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"The House With A Past" from 1942 This horror series aired in multiple iterations from 1930-1944. It consisted of standalone tales told by "The Hermit," a mysterious, cackling storyteller. It was first broadcast on a Detroit radio station before moving to Los Angeles, where the show would be produced by William Conrad (creator and voice of Gunsmoke's Marshall Matt Dillon)

4:00 pm – 4:30 pm Suspense
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"You Died Last Night" from 4/1/1962 Suspense debuted on June 17, 1942 as a sustaining summer replacement, returned that fall and continued in the CBS lineup until September 30, 1962. "Radio's outstanding theatre of thrills" is recognized as one of the finest dramatic series in the history of broadcasting.

4:30 pm – 5:00 pm Yours Truly, Johnny Dollar
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"The Latrodectus Matter" from 4/16/1961 Yours Truly, Johnny Dollar told the story of the freelance insurance investigator with the "action-packed expense account." Radio’s last great detective series, Yours Truly, Johnny Dollar ended its run September 30, 1962 during the final week of network radio drama.

5:00 pm – 5:30 pm Broadway is My Beat
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"Philip Tyler Murder Case" from 8/1/1953 Broadway Is My Beat debuted over CBS on February 27, 1949 and continued through August 1, 1954. Anthony Ross starred as Clover during the first two seasons, with Thor taking over the role on July 3, 1950. Homicide detective Clover pounded the Broadway beat for five years in one of radio's last great detective series.

5:30 pm – 6:00 pm Sherlock Holmes
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"Case Of Accidental Murderess" from 11/26/1945 ased on the popular characters created by Sir Arthur Conan Doyle, The Adventures of Sherlock Holmes began on coast-to-coast CBS radio in 1930. By the late 1930s The Adventures of Sherlock Holmes had moved to the Mutual Broadcasting Network and the series was forced to rely on invented new adventures, having run out of Doyle stories to adapt.

6:00 pm – 7:00 pm Jack Benny Program
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"Murder On The Grid Iron Week 1" from 12/3/1939 --- "Murder On The Grid Iron Week 2" from 12/10/1939 For more than 20 years, Jack Benny reigned as the king of radio comedy. His show ran on nearly every network from 1932 to the mid 1950s. How he turned a miserable, self-absorbed cheapskate into a beloved icon ranks among the great achievements in entertainment history. Benny revolutionized the way humor was played on radio by introducing the situation comedy and by giving most of the best lines to his supporting cast.

7:00 pm – 7:30 pm The Green Hornet
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"Corpse That Wasn't There" from 2/28/1943 The Green Hornet debuted in Detroit on January 31, 1936. The Green Hornet was well-served by his valet Kato and a supercharged roadster, the Black Beauty. Al Hodge portrayed The Green Hornet during the series' first seven seasons, followed by Donovan Faust, Robert Hall and Jack McCarthy. The show ran on radio through December 5, 1952.

7:30 pm – 8:00 pm Wild Bill Hickok
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"Secret Of Arroyo Diablo" from 8/26/1951 This children's western series aired on Mutual from May 1951 - February 1956. Guy Madison starred as Marshall Wild Bill Hickok with Andy Devine as his sidekick Jingles. Each week, the pair encounters a gang of troublemakers along the trail and have it out in a battle of good guys Vs. bad guys.

8:00 pm – 8:30 pm Suspense
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"Concerto For Killer & Eyewitnesses" from 6/9/1952 Suspense debuted on June 17, 1942 as a sustaining summer replacement, returned that fall and continued in the CBS lineup until September 30, 1962. "Radio's outstanding theatre of thrills" is recognized as one of the finest dramatic series in the history of broadcasting.

8:30 pm – 9:00 pm The Whistler
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"Broken Chain" from 5/20/1946 The Whistler whistled its way onto the airwaves beginning May 16, 1942 and its eerie 13-note theme set the tone for West Coast radio mystery for the next decade. "I am the Whistler and I know many things, for I walk by night. I know many strange tales hidden in the hearts of men and women who have stepped into the shadows. Yes, I know the nameless terrors of which they dare not speak."

9:00 pm – 10:00 pm Phil Harris & Alice Faye Show
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"Elephant For Mr. Scott" from 12/14/1952 --- "New Fire Chief" from 1/30/1949 The Phil Harris & Alice Faye Show grew out of the popular Fitch Bandwagon series. Phil Harris played himself, continuing the egotistical, smart-alec characterization he had perfected during his years as Jack Bennys' bandleader. Alice Faye, Phil's movie star wife, recreated her real-life role as a film star turn devoted housewife.

10:00 pm – 10:30 pm Radio Classics
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"Gregory Hood, Suspect" from 9/20/1946 Radio Classics invites you to experience the audio magic of legendary old time radio. RadioClassics features the best dramas, mysteries, comedies, and variety programs from the Golden Age of Radio.

10:30 pm – 11:00 pm Voyage of the Scarlet Queen
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"Wandering Master & Warlord At Rest" from 12/10/1947

11:00 pm – 11:30 pm Crime Classics
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"Madeline Smith Maid Or Murderess" from 1/20/1954 Crime Classics featured "true crime stories from the records and newspapers of every land from every time" culled from director Elliott Lewis' voluminous personal library of true crime cases. The CBS series ran from June 15, 1953 through June 30, 1954.

11:30 pm – Tuesday Midnight The Unexpected
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"Eavesdropper" from 6/20/1948 These frightening tales always ended with - you guessed it - an unexpected twist. Barry Sullivan, Virginia Gregg, and Lurene Tuttle appeared in this syndicated series in 1948.



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