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Time Zone
Saturday 7/22
6:30 am – 7:00 am Our Miss Brooks
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"The New Principal (Premiere)" from 7/19/1948 Eve Arden portrays Miss Connie Brooks, an overworked and underpaid teacher of 10th grade English at Madison High School. Our Miss Brooks called her radio classroom to order beginning July 19, 1948. The final bell rang for Our Miss Brooks on July 7, 1957.

7:00 am – 7:30 am Columbia Workshop
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"Alice & The Echo" from 12/14/1946 Also known as the CBS Radio Workshop, this was an experimental anthology series that pushed the envelope of defining art with its creative use of sound. It featured many New York actors and scripts by some of the country's best writers. It aired in various forms on CBS from 1936 - 1957

7:30 am – 8:00 am Jack Armstrong, The All-American Boy
close Jack Armstrong, The All-American Boy

"Whisper Captured" from 3/5/1941 Radio Classics invites you to experience the audio magic of legendary old time radio. RadioClassics features the best dramas, mysteries, comedies, and variety programs from the Golden Age of Radio.

8:00 am – 9:00 am When Radio Was
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Radio Spirits' nationally syndicated radio program hosted by old-time radio expert Greg Bell

9:00 am – 9:30 am Night Beat
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"The Devil's Bible" from 7/24/1950 Frank Lovejoy is heard as Randy "Lucky" Stone, a hardboiled reporter who covers the "nightbeat" for the Chicago Star. Randy Stone wandered the back alleys and bars of Chicago, searching for both crime and human-interest stories. Nightbeat premiered on February 6, 1950 and ran until September 25, 1952.

9:30 am – 10:00 am The Whistler
close The Whistler

"Death Watch" from 6/25/1945 The Whistler whistled its way onto the airwaves beginning May 16, 1942 and its eerie 13-note theme set the tone for West Coast radio mystery for the next decade. "I am the Whistler and I know many things, for I walk by night. I know many strange tales hidden in the hearts of men and women who have stepped into the shadows. Yes, I know the nameless terrors of which they dare not speak."

10:00 am – 11:00 am Suspense
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"Case History Of Edgar Lowndes" 6/8/1944 "John Barbie & Son" 2/22/1945 Suspense debuted on June 17, 1942 as a sustaining summer replacement, returned that fall and continued in the CBS lineup until September 30, 1962. "Radio's outstanding theatre of thrills" is recognized as one of the finest dramatic series in the history of broadcasting.

11:00 am – 11:30 am Life of Riley
close Life of Riley

"Efficiency Expert" from 1/11/1947 The Life of Riley featured the comic misadventures of riveter Chester A. Riley. Riley was a devoted family man with a talent for flying off the handle and a penchant for being worse. Movie star William Bendix played the title role of the lovable hardhat throughout the series.

11:30 am – 12:00 pm Jack Benny Program
close Jack Benny Program

"Little Red Riding Hood" from 12/19/1937 For more than 20 years, Jack Benny reigned as the king of radio comedy. His show ran on nearly every network from 1932 to the mid 1950s. How he turned a miserable, self-absorbed cheapskate into a beloved icon ranks among the great achievements in entertainment history. Benny revolutionized the way humor was played on radio by introducing the situation comedy and by giving most of the best lines to his supporting cast.

12:00 pm – 12:30 pm Suspense
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"Cat & Mouse" from 3/30/1944 Suspense debuted on June 17, 1942 as a sustaining summer replacement, returned that fall and continued in the CBS lineup until September 30, 1962. "Radio's outstanding theatre of thrills" is recognized as one of the finest dramatic series in the history of broadcasting.

12:30 pm – 1:00 pm Mr. & Mrs. North
close Mr. & Mrs. North

"Who Killed Mr. Stefano?" from 8/9/1944 This mystery series aired on NBC and CBS from 1942 to 1954, originally starring Alice Frost and Joseph Curtin. The title characters were a married couple of amateur detectives who somehow always managed to solve crimes that stumped professional police and detectives.

1:00 pm – 1:30 pm Tales of the Texas Rangers
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"Dead Give-Away" from 10/15/1950 Tales of the Texas Rangers was broadcast over NBC from July 8 1950 through September 14, 1952 and was later revived on television. Western film star Joel McCrea portrayed Ranger Jace Pearson in NBC's Tales of the Texas Rangers.

1:30 pm – 2:00 pm The Fat Man
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"Murder Wins The Draw" from 4/1/1949 The Fat Man was a detective series based on a character created by Dashiell Hammett. The show aired on ABC from 1946 to 1951. J. Scott Smart starred as Brad Runyon, a portly, powerful and witty detective.

2:00 pm – 3:00 pm Adventures of Sam Spade
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"Tears of Night Caper" from 7/24/49 "Soap Opera Caper" from 2/16/51 Dashiell Hammett's Sam Spade walked out of the pages of Black Mask and into his own CBS radio series of July 12, 1946. Howard Duff starred as the hardboiled detective for the first three seasons. Lurene Tuttle was Sam's secretary Effie Perrine and Jerry Hausner was his lawyer Sid Weiss. CBS dropped the series in 1950 when Hammett ran afoul of Congress' Un-American Activities investigators, but the show was quickly revived by NBC.

3:00 pm – 3:30 pm Boston Blackie
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"Dynamite Thompson" from 4/27/1949 Boston Blackie was created by Jack Boyle, a hard-drinking opium addict who served three prison terms. While in prison, Boyle began writing true-crime confession stories that were published in The American Magazine under the byline 6006, his convict number. Boyle's stories were collected in his 1919 book, Boston Blackie, and inspired a popular series of B-films, the radio series and a 1951 video version.

3:30 pm – 4:00 pm Suspense
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"Bon Voyage" from 7/3/1960 Suspense debuted on June 17, 1942 as a sustaining summer replacement, returned that fall and continued in the CBS lineup until September 30, 1962. "Radio's outstanding theatre of thrills" is recognized as one of the finest dramatic series in the history of broadcasting.

4:00 pm – 4:30 pm Damon Runyon Theatre
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"Hottest Guy In The World" from 5/15/1949 This anthology series dramatized the stories of fiction author Damon Runyon and aired in various forms from the late 1940s to the mid 1950s. John Brown starred as "Broadway," a fluent "Brooklynese" speaker who spun tales of old Manhattan.

4:30 pm – 5:00 pm Dr. Kildare
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"Barbara Lane, Dope Addict" from 3/1/1950 This medical drama was based on films by the same name. Lews Ayes as Dr. Kildare and Lionel Barrymore as Dr. Gillespie face everything from pushy administrators to personal drama and ethical crises in the halls of Blair General Hospital in New York City

5:00 pm – 5:30 pm I Was A Communist for the FBI
close I Was A Communist for the FBI

"A Suit For The Party" from 9/14/1952 I Was a Communist for the FBI--I walk alone. The 1952 syndicated series starred Dana Andrews as real-life undercover agent Matt Cvetic, whose book of the same title provided the inspiration for the radio series and a Hollywood film. Growing out of the communist paranoia of the McCarthy era, the Cold War drama featured red spies portrayed in the same stereotypical manner of the Nazis during World Ward II propaganda programs.

5:30 pm – 6:00 pm Gunsmoke
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"Old Fool" from 8/7/1960 Radio’s greatest adult western told the story of Matt Dillon, U.S. Marshal, "the first man they look for and the last they want to meet." Gunsmoke grew out of a request from CBS founder William Paley for a "Philip Marlowe in the Old West," and featured grimly realistic stories set in the vicinity of Dodge City, the "Gommorrah of the West," with William Conrad as Dillon.

6:00 pm – 6:30 pm Damon Runyon Theatre
close Damon Runyon Theatre

"The Lacework Kid" from 9/25/1949 This anthology series dramatized the stories of fiction author Damon Runyon and aired in various forms from the late 1940s to the mid 1950s. John Brown starred as "Broadway," a fluent "Brooklynese" speaker who spun tales of old Manhattan.

6:30 pm – 7:00 pm Mercury Theatre On The Air
close Mercury Theatre On The Air

"Around The World In 80 Days" from 6/7/1946 Created by Orson Welles, this weekly hour-long show presented classic literary works. The series debuted on CBS on July 11, 1938. After the renown (and accidental panic) of "The War of the Worlds", which aired about 6 months after the series began, Campbell's Soup signed on as the sponser and the show became the Campbell Playhouse.

7:00 pm – 8:00 pm Lux Radio Theatre
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"Blood on the Sun" from 12/3/1945 The Lux Radio Theatre was one of radio's most popular series attracting Hollywood's top stars and boasting a lavish budget. The Lux Radio Theatre began in 1934 featuring dramas from Broadway, but there was not enough material to support the show. In an attempt to reverse the slipping ratings, the show was moved to Hollywood in 1936, where there was plenty of material and talent.

8:00 pm – 9:00 pm This Is Your F.B.I
close This Is Your F.B.I

"The Harvest" from 9/28/1951 --- "Runaway Sister" from 4/13/1951 This Is Your F.B.I. came to the Blue Network on April 6, 1945, created, produced and directed by Jerry Devine, a former child actor. Like Philips H. Lord before him, Devine got special permission from bureau head J. Edgar Hoover to dramatize older cases using fictitious names and locales. Frank Lovejoy was the program's first narrator, followed by Dean Carlton and later William Woodson.

9:00 pm – 9:30 pm Dragnet
close Dragnet

"The Big Betty" from 11/23/1950 One of the most popular police dramas in the history of broadcasting, Dragnet aired on NBC Radio from June 10, 1949 through February 7, 1957 and on television from 1952-59 and 1967-72. Dragnet introduced a new era of documentary-style realism.

9:30 pm – 10:00 pm Adventures of Philip Marlowe
close Adventures of Philip Marlowe

"Vital Statistic" from 3/14/1950 Raymond Chandler introduced readers to Philip Marlowe in his 1939 novel The Big Sleep. Humphrey Bogart, Robert Montgomery and George Montgomery portrayed the hardboiled detective in films before Van Heflin took over as Marlowe in NBC’s 1947 summer series.The Adventures of Philip Marlowe returned September 26, 1948, as a CBS series and starred Gerald Mohr. CBS Chairman William S. Paley was a big fan of The Adventures of Philip Marlowe, and his request for a "Philip Marlowe in the West" led to the development of the legendary western Gunsmoke.

10:00 pm – 11:30 pm Yours Truly, Johnny Dollar
close Yours Truly, Johnny Dollar

"The Cranesburg Matter" from 8/24/1956 Yours Truly, Johnny Dollar told the story of the freelance insurance investigator with the "action-packed expense account." Radio’s last great detective series, Yours Truly, Johnny Dollar ended its run September 30, 1962 during the final week of network radio drama.

11:30 pm – Saturday Midnight Police Headquarters
close Police Headquarters

"$190,000 Money Transfer" from 4/15/35 This police procedural series was syndicated on NBC stations in 1932. It features quarter-hour stories typically based on true crimes.

Sunday 7/23
12:00 am – 1:00 am Lux Radio Theatre
close Lux Radio Theatre

"Alibi Ike" from 4/19/1937 The Lux Radio Theatre was one of radio's most popular series attracting Hollywood's top stars and boasting a lavish budget. The Lux Radio Theatre began in 1934 featuring dramas from Broadway, but there was not enough material to support the show. In an attempt to reverse the slipping ratings, the show was moved to Hollywood in 1936, where there was plenty of material and talent.

1:00 am – 1:30 am Yours Truly, Johnny Dollar
close Yours Truly, Johnny Dollar

"Virginia Beach Matter" from 8/31/1950 Yours Truly, Johnny Dollar told the story of the freelance insurance investigator with the "action-packed expense account." Radio’s last great detective series, Yours Truly, Johnny Dollar ended its run September 30, 1962 during the final week of network radio drama.

1:30 am – 2:00 am Gunsmoke
close Gunsmoke

"Letter Of The Law" from 7/15/1956 Radio’s greatest adult western told the story of Matt Dillon, U.S. Marshal, "the first man they look for and the last they want to meet." Gunsmoke grew out of a request from CBS founder William Paley for a "Philip Marlowe in the Old West," and featured grimly realistic stories set in the vicinity of Dodge City, the "Gommorrah of the West," with William Conrad as Dillon.

2:00 am – 3:00 am Burns & Allen Show
close Burns & Allen Show

"Quiz Show" from 9/26/1946 --- Guest: Jack Benny (Gypsy Band) from 1/8/1948 George and Gracie first performed on air over the BBC while touring England after an NBC executive rejected their act insisting that "Gracie’s voice is unfit for radio." Burns and Allen won a regular spot on The Robert Burns Panatella Program February 22, 1932 and moved into the top spot when Guy Lombardo left the series. The Burns and Allen Show aired through May 17, 1950 on radio and for another decade on television. Jack Benny and George Burns were best friends in real life and often were guests on each other’s programs.

3:00 am – 3:30 am Jack Benny Program
close Jack Benny Program

Guest: Burns & Allen from 1/15/1947 For more than 20 years, Jack Benny reigned as the king of radio comedy. His show ran on nearly every network from 1932 to the mid 1950s. How he turned a miserable, self-absorbed cheapskate into a beloved icon ranks among the great achievements in entertainment history. Benny revolutionized the way humor was played on radio by introducing the situation comedy and by giving most of the best lines to his supporting cast.

3:30 am – 3:45 am The Bickersons
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"John's Wrecked Car" from 2/23/1947

3:45 am – 4:00 am Baby Snooks
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"Red Cross Exam" from 3/26/1942 Baby Snooks was born at a Detroit party when Fanny Brice, then performing burlesque, sang "Poor Pauline" in a little-girl voice, and was revived for her first radio broadcasts in the '30s. Frank Morgan and Alan Reed served as Snooks’ foils on early broadcasts before Hanley Stafford became radio’s longest-running "Daddy." The Baby Snooks Show aired from September 17, 1944 through May 29, 1951, with Stafford delivering a moving eulogy on the final show following Brice’s death from a cerebral hemorrhage.

4:00 am – 5:00 am The Shadow
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"The Phantom Fingerprints" from 10/29/1939 --- "Dream Of Death" from 11/9/1947 The Shadow debuted July 31, 1930 as the sinister narrator of CBS’ Street & Smith’s Detective Story Hour. The popularity of the phantom host led the nation’s largest publisher of pulp fiction to launch a mystery magazine devoted to The Shadow’s adventures.

5:00 am – 5:30 am The Weird Circle
close The Weird Circle

"The Rope Of Hair" from 4/16/1944 This horror series consisted mostly of adapted supernatural tales from greats like Edgar Allen Poe and Robert Louis Stevenson. It aired for two seasons from 1943-1945, first on Mutual and then on NBC's Red network.

5:30 am – 6:00 am The Falcon
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"The Broken Key" from 7/24/1952 Michael Waring was a freelance detective who was also known as the Falcon. Waring's detective techniques were a cross between Ellery Queen and Richard Diamond. He had a certain eye for detail but was frequently on the outs with the police.

6:00 am – 6:30 am Fred Allen Show
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Guest: Leo Durocher from 12/2/1945 John Steinbeck recognized Fred Allen as "unquestionably the best humorist of our time, a brilliant critic of manners and morals." Following in the footsteps of Will Rogers, Fred reintroduced topical political humor to radio. Fred introduced his classic "Allen’s Alley" segment December 13, 1942.

6:30 am – 7:00 am Jack Benny Program
close Jack Benny Program

Guest: Leo Durocher from 11/9/1941 For more than 20 years, Jack Benny reigned as the king of radio comedy. His show ran on nearly every network from 1932 to the mid 1950s. How he turned a miserable, self-absorbed cheapskate into a beloved icon ranks among the great achievements in entertainment history. Benny revolutionized the way humor was played on radio by introducing the situation comedy and by giving most of the best lines to his supporting cast.

7:00 am – 7:30 am Life of Riley
close Life of Riley

"Cissie & Lionel" from 1/20/1950 The Life of Riley featured the comic misadventures of riveter Chester A. Riley. Riley was a devoted family man with a talent for flying off the handle and a penchant for being worse. Movie star William Bendix played the title role of the lovable hardhat throughout the series.

7:30 am – 8:00 am Dennis Day Show
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"Room For Rent" from 9/25/1948 Born Owen Patrick Eugene McNulty in an Irish family in the Bronx, Dennis Day first became known for his tenor voice as a replacement singer on Jack Benny's radio show on October 8, 1939. Benny and Day would remain friends and colleagues the rest of their lives. "A Day In The Life Of Dennis Day" aired on NBC from 1946-1951, while Day also regularly appeared on Benny's show singing, telling jokes, and performing impressions.

8:00 am – 8:30 am The Chase
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"Flight From Istanbul" from 10/5/1952 This NBC thriller ran for about a year from the spring of 1952 to the summer of 1953. Each unique story entails suspense, action and, of course, a protagonist on the run. The series often featured guest stars who were announcers or actors for other suspenseful series, and many of the scripts were also used in other dramas like The Clock and Inner Sanctum Mysteries.

8:30 am – 9:00 am The Whistler
close The Whistler

"Shrunken Head" from 6/13/1942 The Whistler whistled its way onto the airwaves beginning May 16, 1942 and its eerie 13-note theme set the tone for West Coast radio mystery for the next decade. "I am the Whistler and I know many things, for I walk by night. I know many strange tales hidden in the hearts of men and women who have stepped into the shadows. Yes, I know the nameless terrors of which they dare not speak."

9:00 am – 9:30 am Quiet, Please
close Quiet, Please

"Dark Rosaleen" from 3/13/1949 Quiet Please was one of radio’s most imaginative series, created and written by Wyllis Cooper, the talented writer/director who created radio’s legendary Lights Out in 1934 and scripted the 1939 horror film The Son of Frankenstein. Ernest Chappell starred in the series, narrating the stories in a quiet, underplayed conversational tone. Quiet Please aired over the Mutual airwaves from June 8, 1947 through September 13, 1948 and over ABC from September 19, 1948 through June 25, 1949.

9:30 am – 10:00 am Lum and Abner
close Lum and Abner

"Magazine Article About Rocket" from 11/24/1942 Chester Lauck and Norris Goff were first heard as Lum and Abner on a radio fundraiser for flood victims. Improvising the spot, they went on the air as the "fellers from the hills" and won a regular spot on KTHS beginning April 26, 1931. Lum and Abner moved into an NBC summer berth July 27, 1931 and aired nationally from May 22, 1933 through May 7, 1954.

10:00 am – 11:00 am Dragnet
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"Big Mask (Week 1) " from 12/28/1952 ---- "Big Mask (Week 2)" from 1/4/1953 One of the most popular police dramas in the history of broadcasting, Dragnet aired on NBC Radio from June 10, 1949 through February 7, 1957 and on television from 1952-59 and 1967-72. Dragnet introduced a new era of documentary-style realism.

11:00 am – 11:30 am Adventures of Harry Nile
close Adventures of Harry Nile

"Box 111" from 2/10/2008 This series is one of a few modern series featured by Radio Classics. A creation of writer Jim French, Harry Nile first came to radio in 1976 and continued to be adapted into the late '90s as part of the "Imagination Theatre" productions. Harry Nile, a former Chicago cop turned private detective, was played by Phil Harper for more than 20 years.

11:30 am – 12:00 pm The Green Hornet
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"Smuggler Signs His Name" from 11/25/1939 The Green Hornet debuted in Detroit on January 31, 1936. The Green Hornet was well-served by his valet Kato and a supercharged roadster, the Black Beauty. Al Hodge portrayed The Green Hornet during the series' first seven seasons, followed by Donovan Faust, Robert Hall and Jack McCarthy. The show ran on radio through December 5, 1952.

12:00 pm – 12:30 pm Mail Call
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"State Of Maine Tribute (Fred Allen)" from 8/9/1944

12:30 pm – 1:00 pm Duffy's Tavern
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"George Jessel & Rudy Vallee" from 11/5/1947 Millions of radio listeners visited Duffy's Tavern each week, but Duffy himself was nowhere to be found. Although he dutifully phoned Archie the manager each week, he never once dropped by. Duffy's Tavern first opened its doors to radio listeners on the CBS audition series Forecast on July 29, 1940, and then opened for regular business on March 1, 1941.

1:00 pm – 1:40 pm The Bickersons
close The Bickersons

"Blanche Has A Stomach Ache" from 3/2/1947

1:40 pm – 2:00 pm Vic & Sade
close Vic & Sade

"Aunt Bess" from 6/15/1944 Vic and Sade aired from June 29, 1932 through December 7, 1945 and was briefly revived in a half-hour sitcom format in 1946. "Radio’s home folks" were featured in slice-of-life situations that painted a rich portrait of small-town life. Starring Art Van Harvey and Bernardine Flynn.

2:00 pm – 3:00 pm Suspense
close Suspense

"Give Me Liberty" from 10/21/1948 --- "The Man Who Cried Wolf" from 2/9/1953 Suspense debuted on June 17, 1942 as a sustaining summer replacement, returned that fall and continued in the CBS lineup until September 30, 1962. "Radio's outstanding theatre of thrills" is recognized as one of the finest dramatic series in the history of broadcasting.

3:00 pm – 3:30 pm Screen Director's Playhouse
close Screen Director's Playhouse

"Love Crazy" from 8/19/1949 The Screen Director's Playhouse featured adaptations of famous movies and called upon the screen directors to introduce and highlight their work. After each show, the director and stars gathered around the microphones to reminisce about the actual making of the film.

3:30 pm – 4:00 pm Life With Luigi
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"Pascuale's Birthday" from 6/19/1949 Longtime Hollywood character actor J. Carrol Naish became a radio star in his own right after nearly two decades toiling in the background in such films as Beau Geste, House of Frankenstein and the Batman movie serial. The native New Yorker of Irish descent finally won fame as "the little Italian immigrant" who each week wrote of his American adventures to his mama in Italy. Life with Luigi aired from September 21, 1948 through March 3, 1953 on radio, and the radio cast briefly did double duty in a short-lived 1952 television version.

4:00 pm – 5:00 pm Philo Vance, Detective
close Philo Vance, Detective

"Alibi Murder Case" from 6/6/1950 ---- "One Cent Murder Case" from 7/12/1950 Philo Vance was the most popular fictional detective during the late 1920s and early 1930s and influenced the creation of many later detectives. S.S. Van Dine's legendary creation was first brought to radio on July 5, 1945 in an NBC summer series starring Jose Ferrar and was also briefly portrayed by John Emery.

5:00 pm – 5:30 pm Suspense
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"Hide and Seek" from 5/13/1962 Suspense debuted on June 17, 1942 as a sustaining summer replacement, returned that fall and continued in the CBS lineup until September 30, 1962. "Radio's outstanding theatre of thrills" is recognized as one of the finest dramatic series in the history of broadcasting.

5:30 pm – 6:00 pm The Shadow
close The Shadow

"Death To The Shadow" from 3/12/1944 The Shadow debuted July 31, 1930 as the sinister narrator of CBS’ Street & Smith’s Detective Story Hour. The popularity of the phantom host led the nation’s largest publisher of pulp fiction to launch a mystery magazine devoted to The Shadow’s adventures.

6:00 pm – 7:00 pm When Radio Was
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Radio Spirits' nationally syndicated radio program hosted by old-time radio expert Greg Bell

7:00 pm – 7:30 pm Romance of the Ranchos
close Romance of the Ranchos

"Joseph Chapman" from 1/7/1942 This historical drama told tales of early Southern California in "the days of the dons". Stories were based on records from Title Insurance, the show's sponsor. History was made as land changed hands and purposes, causing listeners to think twice about the stories behind their own West Coast land the in mid-1940s.

7:30 pm – 8:00 pm The Mysterious Traveler
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"Man Who Knew Everything" from 10/9/1951 The Mysterious Traveler was one of radio's greatest omniscient storytellers, introducing tales of mystery, science fiction and horror from the typewriters of writers/producers Robert A. Arthur and David Kogan. The Mysterious Traveler rode the Mutual rails from December 5, 1943 through September 23, 1952.

8:00 pm – 8:30 pm Honest Harold
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"Advertising Shark Repellent" from 10/4/1950 AKA "The Harold Peary Show" -- Peary, best known for his role as Gildersleeve on the Fibber McGee & Molly Show (and later on The Great Gildserleeve), starred in this short-lived sitcom. After acting as Gildersleeve on NBC for more than 10 years, Peary switched to CBS for this series, which only ran for one season. However, during the show's run, then-governor Earl Warren awarded Peary for his 10,000th radio broadcast (Warren later became Chief Justice of the US Supreme Court)

8:30 pm – 9:00 pm Great Gildersleeve
close Great Gildersleeve

"Leroy's Debt" from 10/14/1945 The Great Gildersleeve featured one of radio’s greatest casts of comedic players. The Great Gildersleeve aired until March 21, 1957, with Willard Waterman taking over the title role for the final seven radio season and three television seasons.

9:00 pm – 9:30 pm Fibber McGee & Molly
close Fibber McGee & Molly

"Fibber Quits Smoking" from 10/8/1940 The husband-and-wife vaudeville team of Jim and Marian Jordan began their radio careers in Peoria on a bet from Jim’s brother. The Jordans were heard as The O’Henry Twins and The Air Scouts before Don Quinn created Smackout in 1931. Quinn revamped the show as Fibber McGee and Molly in 1935 when Johnson’s Wax signed on as sponsor.

9:30 pm – 10:00 pm Charlie McCarthy Show
close Charlie McCarthy Show

"Highlights From Bergen's Career" from 6/11/1953 Ventriloquist Edgar Bergen developed his Charlie McCarthy character in high school. Bergen performed with the newsboy dummy while attending Northwestern University and eventually left college to tour vaudeville. With the decline of vaudeville during the Great Depression, Bergen moved into night spots like New York’s trendy Rainbow Room but feared his friend wouldn’t be appreciated by high society. So he gave Charlie a monocle and top hat and a "man about town" was born. Following a three-month guest stint on Rudy Vallee’s show, Edgar Bergen was signed as headliner of The Chase and Sanborn Hour. The series premiered May 9, 1937 and ended the next three seasons as radio’s top-rated series.

10:00 pm – 11:00 pm Adventures of Philip Marlowe
close Adventures of Philip Marlowe

"The Fatted Calf" from 9/24/1949 ---- "Girl From Pitchfork Corners" from 7/5/1950 Raymond Chandler introduced readers to Philip Marlowe in his 1939 novel The Big Sleep. Humphrey Bogart, Robert Montgomery and George Montgomery portrayed the hardboiled detective in films before Van Heflin took over as Marlowe in NBC’s 1947 summer series.The Adventures of Philip Marlowe returned September 26, 1948, as a CBS series and starred Gerald Mohr. CBS Chairman William S. Paley was a big fan of The Adventures of Philip Marlowe, and his request for a "Philip Marlowe in the West" led to the development of the legendary western Gunsmoke.

11:00 pm – 11:30 pm Dimension X
close Dimension X

"Nightmare" from 6/10/1951 Dimension X aired over NBC from April 8, 1950 through September 29, 1951 featuring "adventures in time and space told in future tense." The series adapted stories by the modern masters of science fiction adapting works by Isaac Asimov, Ray Bradbury, Robert Heinlein, Clifford Simak, Theodore Sturgeon and many others.

11:30 pm – Sunday Midnight X Minus One
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"Reluctant Heroes" from 12/19/1956 X-Minus One premiered on April 24, 195 and was a revival of Dimension X, NBC's earlier science fiction anthology series. X-Minus One ran until January 9, 1958 and was rerun during the 1970s as part of NBC's Omnibus series.

Monday 7/24
12:00 am – 12:30 am Suspense
close Suspense

"Want Ad" from 7/11/1956 Suspense debuted on June 17, 1942 as a sustaining summer replacement, returned that fall and continued in the CBS lineup until September 30, 1962. "Radio's outstanding theatre of thrills" is recognized as one of the finest dramatic series in the history of broadcasting.

12:30 am – 1:00 am This Is Your F.B.I
close This Is Your F.B.I

"Jungle Killer" from 12/15/1950 This Is Your F.B.I. came to the Blue Network on April 6, 1945, created, produced and directed by Jerry Devine, a former child actor. Like Philips H. Lord before him, Devine got special permission from bureau head J. Edgar Hoover to dramatize older cases using fictitious names and locales. Frank Lovejoy was the program's first narrator, followed by Dean Carlton and later William Woodson.

1:00 am – 1:30 am Escape - Radio Classics
close Escape - Radio Classics

"Dream of Armageddon" from 9/5/1948 Radio's greatest series of high adventure debuted over the CBS network on July 7,1947. Escape's protagonists faced life-and-death situations each week, as the show careened from classic adventure to Western drama to science fiction. The program was broadcast as a sustainer (unsponsored) series during most of its seven-year run.

1:30 am – 2:00 am The Shadow
close The Shadow

"Death On The Rails" from 4/13/1941 The Shadow debuted July 31, 1930 as the sinister narrator of CBS’ Street & Smith’s Detective Story Hour. The popularity of the phantom host led the nation’s largest publisher of pulp fiction to launch a mystery magazine devoted to The Shadow’s adventures.

2:00 am – 2:30 am The Line-Up
close The Line-Up

"The Holstedter Case" from 12/21/1950 This CBS cop procedural pulls back the curtain on crime fighting in San Francisco. The Shadow's Bill Johnstone starred as cool-mannered Lt. Ben Guthrie, foil to hot-tempered Sgt. Matt Grebb. Director Elliot Lewis was one of the busiest men in radio, having a hand in the Phil Harris & Alice Faye Show, Suspense, Broadway Is My Beat, and many more.

2:30 am – 3:00 am Richard Diamond, Private Detective
close Richard Diamond, Private Detective

"The Carnival" from 3/30/1951 Richard Diamond, Private Detective premiered over the NBC network on April 24, 1949 and ran through 1952 starring Dick Powell as "radio's singing detective." Powell had first achieved movie stardom as a baby-faced crooner, and later matured to hardboiled roles, including Raymond Chandler's Philip Marlowe in the 1944 film Murder My Sweet.

3:00 am – 3:30 am Alan Young Show
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"Smashed Fender" from 2/8/1946 This sitcom aired from 1944-1949, first as a summer replacement series for Eddie Cantor's show. Then, after signing on as a regular on the Jimmy Durante show, young scored his own show with Tums as a sponsor. Today he is best known as TV's Wilbur Post, who talked with Mr. Ed the horse.

3:30 am – 4:00 am Great Gildersleeve
close Great Gildersleeve

"Gildy Picks Husband For Marjorie" from 5/6/1945 The Great Gildersleeve featured one of radio’s greatest casts of comedic players. The Great Gildersleeve aired until March 21, 1957, with Willard Waterman taking over the title role for the final seven radio season and three television seasons.

4:00 am – 4:30 am Burns & Allen Show
close Burns & Allen Show

"Gracie Tries To Hypnotize George" from 1/31/1946 George and Gracie first performed on air over the BBC while touring England after an NBC executive rejected their act insisting that "Gracie’s voice is unfit for radio." Burns and Allen won a regular spot on The Robert Burns Panatella Program February 22, 1932 and moved into the top spot when Guy Lombardo left the series. The Burns and Allen Show aired through May 17, 1950 on radio and for another decade on television. Jack Benny and George Burns were best friends in real life and often were guests on each other’s programs.

4:30 am – 5:00 am Jack Benny Program
close Jack Benny Program

"Gracie Visits (Running For President)" from 3/3/1940 For more than 20 years, Jack Benny reigned as the king of radio comedy. His show ran on nearly every network from 1932 to the mid 1950s. How he turned a miserable, self-absorbed cheapskate into a beloved icon ranks among the great achievements in entertainment history. Benny revolutionized the way humor was played on radio by introducing the situation comedy and by giving most of the best lines to his supporting cast.

5:00 am – 6:00 am Burns & Allen Show
close Burns & Allen Show

"Gracie's Problem With Salesmen" from 5/13/1948 --- "Gracie Turns House Into Office" from 2/27/1947 George and Gracie first performed on air over the BBC while touring England after an NBC executive rejected their act insisting that "Gracie’s voice is unfit for radio." Burns and Allen won a regular spot on The Robert Burns Panatella Program February 22, 1932 and moved into the top spot when Guy Lombardo left the series. The Burns and Allen Show aired through May 17, 1950 on radio and for another decade on television. Jack Benny and George Burns were best friends in real life and often were guests on each other’s programs.

6:00 am – 7:00 am CBS Radio Workshop
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"Brave New World" from 1/27/1956 The CBS Radio Workshop aired from January 27, 1956 through September 22, 1957 and was a revival of the prestigious Columbia Workshop from the 1930s and 1940s. The CBS Workshop regularly featured the works of the world’s greatest writers. including Ray Bradbury, Archibald MacLeish, William Saroyan, Lord Dunsany and Ambrose Bierce.

7:00 am – 7:30 am Columbia Workshop
close Columbia Workshop

"Brucie & Willie" from 10/12/1946 Also known as the CBS Radio Workshop, this was an experimental anthology series that pushed the envelope of defining art with its creative use of sound. It featured many New York actors and scripts by some of the country's best writers. It aired in various forms on CBS from 1936 - 1957

7:30 am – 8:00 am Police Headquarters
close Police Headquarters

"Boxing Match Death" from 1932 This police procedural series was syndicated on NBC stations in 1932. It features quarter-hour stories typically based on true crimes.

8:00 am – 8:30 am Further Adventures of Sherlock Holmes
close Further Adventures of Sherlock Holmes

"The Godolphin Arabian" from 11/23/2003 Jim French wrote this modern adaptation of mystery's most famous detective as part of the Imagination Theatre productions. These plays were produced and aired in the '00s. John Patrick Lowrie plays Holmes and Lawrence Albert portrays Watson.

8:30 am – 9:00 am Adventures of Frank Race
close Adventures of Frank Race

"The Gold Worshiper" from 3/24/1945 Frank Race is an attorney whose life is filled with intrigue following the war. The adventure series aired from 1949 to 1950. Starring Tom Collins and then Paul Dobov.

9:00 am – 9:30 am The Six Shooter
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"Battle At Tower Rock" from 2/21/1954 The Six Shooter aired started movie star James Stewart rode the radio range from September 20, 1953 through June 24, 1954 as Britt Ponset, "the Texas plainsman who wandered through the western territories, leaving behind a trail of still-remembered legends."

9:30 am – 10:00 am Gunsmoke
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"Long As I Live" from 12/8/1957 Radio’s greatest adult western told the story of Matt Dillon, U.S. Marshal, "the first man they look for and the last they want to meet." Gunsmoke grew out of a request from CBS founder William Paley for a "Philip Marlowe in the Old West," and featured grimly realistic stories set in the vicinity of Dodge City, the "Gommorrah of the West," with William Conrad as Dillon.

10:00 am – 11:30 am Yours Truly, Johnny Dollar
close Yours Truly, Johnny Dollar

"Lansing Fraud Matter" from 12/12/1955 Yours Truly, Johnny Dollar told the story of the freelance insurance investigator with the "action-packed expense account." Radio’s last great detective series, Yours Truly, Johnny Dollar ended its run September 30, 1962 during the final week of network radio drama.

11:30 am – 12:00 pm Dark Venture
close Dark Venture

"Pursuit" from 7/31/1945

12:00 pm – 1:00 pm When Radio Was
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Radio Spirits' nationally syndicated radio program hosted by old-time radio expert Greg Bell

1:00 pm – 1:30 pm Dimension X
close Dimension X

"Universe" from 8/2/1951 Dimension X aired over NBC from April 8, 1950 through September 29, 1951 featuring "adventures in time and space told in future tense." The series adapted stories by the modern masters of science fiction adapting works by Isaac Asimov, Ray Bradbury, Robert Heinlein, Clifford Simak, Theodore Sturgeon and many others.

1:30 pm – 2:00 pm Escape - Radio Classics
close Escape - Radio Classics

"Young Man With Cream Tarts" 11/12/1947 Radio's greatest series of high adventure debuted over the CBS network on July 7,1947. Escape's protagonists faced life-and-death situations each week, as the show careened from classic adventure to Western drama to science fiction. The program was broadcast as a sustainer (unsponsored) series during most of its seven-year run.

2:00 pm – 2:30 pm Everyman's Theatre
close Everyman's Theatre

"The Cat Wife" from 10/18/1940

2:30 pm – 3:00 pm Inner Sanctum Mysteries
close Inner Sanctum Mysteries

"Terrible Vengeance" from 6/14/1942 Inner Sanctum's sinister host welcomed listeners "through the squeaking door to another night of horror." The show’s "squeaking door" was one of radio’s most-remembered openings and was inspired by the creaking hinges on a sound effects door at the radio studio.

3:00 pm – 3:30 pm Cloak & Dagger
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"File 2218" from 5/7/1950 These tense plotlines revolved around the wartime activities of the U.S. government's Office of Strategic Services. Stories were based on true adventure tales by Corey Ford and Alastair MacBain. It ran on NBC for about 6 months from May - October 1950.

3:30 pm – 4:00 pm Don Winslow Of The Navy
close Don Winslow Of The Navy

"Japanese Mini-Sub" from 10/7/1942

4:00 pm – 4:30 pm Red Skelton Show
close Red Skelton Show

"A Day At The Beach" from 4/16/1950 The Red Skelton Show came to NBC on October 7, 1941 after years as a mainstay on Cincinnati's powerhouse station WLW. Red scored with radio audiences as Junior, "the mean widdle kid," a character he originated in vaudeville. Some of his other memorable characters included Deadeye, J. Newton Numbskull, Willie Lump-Lump, Bolivar Shagnasty and Clem Kadiddlehopper.

4:30 pm – 5:00 pm Phil Harris & Alice Faye Show
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"Who Will Replace Phil?" from 3/22/1953 The Phil Harris & Alice Faye Show grew out of the popular Fitch Bandwagon series. Phil Harris played himself, continuing the egotistical, smart-alec characterization he had perfected during his years as Jack Bennys' bandleader. Alice Faye, Phil's movie star wife, recreated her real-life role as a film star turn devoted housewife.

5:00 pm – 5:30 pm An American Gallery
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"A Day To Test, A Day To Learn" from the 1960s Each episode featured the work of a different American artist, mostly musicians, across all genres. The narrator was often also a celebrity, such as Bing Crosby speaking about Louis Armstrong and jazz.

5:30 pm – 6:00 pm CBS Radio Workshop
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"Meditations On Ecclesiastes" from 6/23/1957 The CBS Radio Workshop aired from January 27, 1956 through September 22, 1957 and was a revival of the prestigious Columbia Workshop from the 1930s and 1940s. The CBS Workshop regularly featured the works of the world’s greatest writers. including Ray Bradbury, Archibald MacLeish, William Saroyan, Lord Dunsany and Ambrose Bierce.

6:00 pm – 6:30 pm Night Beat
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"Old Blind Pop" from 8/7/1950 Frank Lovejoy is heard as Randy "Lucky" Stone, a hardboiled reporter who covers the "nightbeat" for the Chicago Star. Randy Stone wandered the back alleys and bars of Chicago, searching for both crime and human-interest stories. Nightbeat premiered on February 6, 1950 and ran until September 25, 1952.

6:30 pm – 7:00 pm The Third Man
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"Cherches La Gem" from 1/4/1952 The Third Man was an adventure series starring Orson Welles as Harry Lime, the character created by author Graham Greene. It first aired on the BBC in 1951 and was then syndicated for American radio in 1952.

7:00 pm – 7:30 pm I Was A Communist for the FBI
close I Was A Communist for the FBI

"Home Improvements" from 11/26/1953 I Was a Communist for the FBI--I walk alone. The 1952 syndicated series starred Dana Andrews as real-life undercover agent Matt Cvetic, whose book of the same title provided the inspiration for the radio series and a Hollywood film. Growing out of the communist paranoia of the McCarthy era, the Cold War drama featured red spies portrayed in the same stereotypical manner of the Nazis during World Ward II propaganda programs.

7:30 pm – 8:00 pm Tales of the Texas Rangers
close Tales of the Texas Rangers

"Death By Adoption" from 3/18/1951 Tales of the Texas Rangers was broadcast over NBC from July 8 1950 through September 14, 1952 and was later revived on television. Western film star Joel McCrea portrayed Ranger Jace Pearson in NBC's Tales of the Texas Rangers.

8:00 pm – 9:00 pm Lux Radio Theatre
close Lux Radio Theatre

"The Show-Off" from 2/1/1943 The Lux Radio Theatre was one of radio's most popular series attracting Hollywood's top stars and boasting a lavish budget. The Lux Radio Theatre began in 1934 featuring dramas from Broadway, but there was not enough material to support the show. In an attempt to reverse the slipping ratings, the show was moved to Hollywood in 1936, where there was plenty of material and talent.

9:00 pm – 9:30 pm Great Gildersleeve
close Great Gildersleeve

"Arrives In Summerfield (Premiere)" from 8/31/1941 The Great Gildersleeve featured one of radio’s greatest casts of comedic players. The Great Gildersleeve aired until March 21, 1957, with Willard Waterman taking over the title role for the final seven radio season and three television seasons.

9:30 pm – 10:00 pm Fibber McGee & Molly
close Fibber McGee & Molly

"Five Tons Of Coal" from 12/3/1940 The husband-and-wife vaudeville team of Jim and Marian Jordan began their radio careers in Peoria on a bet from Jim’s brother. The Jordans were heard as The O’Henry Twins and The Air Scouts before Don Quinn created Smackout in 1931. Quinn revamped the show as Fibber McGee and Molly in 1935 when Johnson’s Wax signed on as sponsor.

10:00 pm – 10:30 pm The Mysterious Traveler
close The Mysterious Traveler

"Man Who Tried To Save Lincoln" from 2/7/1950 The Mysterious Traveler was one of radio's greatest omniscient storytellers, introducing tales of mystery, science fiction and horror from the typewriters of writers/producers Robert A. Arthur and David Kogan. The Mysterious Traveler rode the Mutual rails from December 5, 1943 through September 23, 1952.

10:30 pm – 11:00 pm The Whistler
close The Whistler

"Letters From Aaron Burr" from 11/20/1949 The Whistler whistled its way onto the airwaves beginning May 16, 1942 and its eerie 13-note theme set the tone for West Coast radio mystery for the next decade. "I am the Whistler and I know many things, for I walk by night. I know many strange tales hidden in the hearts of men and women who have stepped into the shadows. Yes, I know the nameless terrors of which they dare not speak."

11:00 pm – 11:30 pm Gunsmoke
close Gunsmoke

"Rock Bottom" from 4/7/1957 Radio’s greatest adult western told the story of Matt Dillon, U.S. Marshal, "the first man they look for and the last they want to meet." Gunsmoke grew out of a request from CBS founder William Paley for a "Philip Marlowe in the Old West," and featured grimly realistic stories set in the vicinity of Dodge City, the "Gommorrah of the West," with William Conrad as Dillon.

11:30 pm – Monday Midnight Romance of the Ranchos
close Romance of the Ranchos

"Phineas Banning" from 3/8/1942 This historical drama told tales of early Southern California in "the days of the dons". Stories were based on records from Title Insurance, the show's sponsor. History was made as land changed hands and purposes, causing listeners to think twice about the stories behind their own West Coast land the in mid-1940s.

Tuesday 7/25
12:00 am – 1:30 am Suspense
close Suspense

"Walls Came Tumbling Down" 6/29/1944 "The Night Reveals" 4/18/1946 "I Had An Alibi" 1/4/1945 Suspense debuted on June 17, 1942 as a sustaining summer replacement, returned that fall and continued in the CBS lineup until September 30, 1962. "Radio's outstanding theatre of thrills" is recognized as one of the finest dramatic series in the history of broadcasting.

1:30 am – 2:00 am Charlie McCarthy Show
close Charlie McCarthy Show

"With Keenan Wynn & Anne Baxter" from 9/23/1945 Ventriloquist Edgar Bergen developed his Charlie McCarthy character in high school. Bergen performed with the newsboy dummy while attending Northwestern University and eventually left college to tour vaudeville. With the decline of vaudeville during the Great Depression, Bergen moved into night spots like New York’s trendy Rainbow Room but feared his friend wouldn’t be appreciated by high society. So he gave Charlie a monocle and top hat and a "man about town" was born. Following a three-month guest stint on Rudy Vallee’s show, Edgar Bergen was signed as headliner of The Chase and Sanborn Hour. The series premiered May 9, 1937 and ended the next three seasons as radio’s top-rated series.

2:00 am – 2:30 am The Family Theater
close The Family Theater

"In Another Year" from 1/1/1948 Some of the biggest names in radio and film star in this dramatic anthology for the whole family from the Mutual Broadcasting System. It was originally created by Father Patrick Peyton of the Holy Cross Fathers to promote fmaily unity and prayer. Networks refused to air it with its one-denominational focus, so it was transformed to a star-studded weekly drama and the religious messages aired instead of commercials.

2:30 am – 3:00 am Behind The Mike
close Behind The Mike

"Zulu Radio Star" from 10/12/1941 "Radio's own show" first ran in 1931 as a 15-minute show, then revamped in 1940 as a half-hour program, hosted by Graham McNamee. Episodes could feature interviews with inventors, producers, show runners and actors, sharing behind-the-scenes stories of how radio shows get made.

3:00 am – 3:30 am Nick Carter, Master Detective
close Nick Carter, Master Detective

"Double Disguise" from 1/8/1944 Nick Carter was the first great detective fiction series. The character of Nick Carter was created by dime novelist John Russell Coryell in his 1886 story, "The Old Detective's Pupil." Nick Carter, Master Detective debuted on April 11, 1943 and ended its long radio run on September 25, 1955.

3:30 am – 4:00 am Boston Blackie
close Boston Blackie

"Three Witnesses Killed" from 6/4/1946 Boston Blackie was created by Jack Boyle, a hard-drinking opium addict who served three prison terms. While in prison, Boyle began writing true-crime confession stories that were published in The American Magazine under the byline 6006, his convict number. Boyle's stories were collected in his 1919 book, Boston Blackie, and inspired a popular series of B-films, the radio series and a 1951 video version.

4:00 am – 5:00 am Adventures of Philip Marlowe
close Adventures of Philip Marlowe

"The Fatted Calf" from 9/24/1949 ---- "Girl From Pitchfork Corners" from 7/5/1950 Raymond Chandler introduced readers to Philip Marlowe in his 1939 novel The Big Sleep. Humphrey Bogart, Robert Montgomery and George Montgomery portrayed the hardboiled detective in films before Van Heflin took over as Marlowe in NBC’s 1947 summer series.The Adventures of Philip Marlowe returned September 26, 1948, as a CBS series and starred Gerald Mohr. CBS Chairman William S. Paley was a big fan of The Adventures of Philip Marlowe, and his request for a "Philip Marlowe in the West" led to the development of the legendary western Gunsmoke.

5:00 am – 5:30 am Dimension X
close Dimension X

"Nightmare" from 6/10/1951 Dimension X aired over NBC from April 8, 1950 through September 29, 1951 featuring "adventures in time and space told in future tense." The series adapted stories by the modern masters of science fiction adapting works by Isaac Asimov, Ray Bradbury, Robert Heinlein, Clifford Simak, Theodore Sturgeon and many others.

5:30 am – 6:00 am X Minus One
close X Minus One

"Reluctant Heroes" from 12/19/1956 X-Minus One premiered on April 24, 195 and was a revival of Dimension X, NBC's earlier science fiction anthology series. X-Minus One ran until January 9, 1958 and was rerun during the 1970s as part of NBC's Omnibus series.

6:00 am – 6:30 am The Green Hornet
close The Green Hornet

"The Cigarette Filters" from 11/19/1952 The Green Hornet debuted in Detroit on January 31, 1936. The Green Hornet was well-served by his valet Kato and a supercharged roadster, the Black Beauty. Al Hodge portrayed The Green Hornet during the series' first seven seasons, followed by Donovan Faust, Robert Hall and Jack McCarthy. The show ran on radio through December 5, 1952.

6:30 am – 7:00 am Casey, Crime Photographer
close Casey, Crime Photographer

"Treasure Cave" from 9/25/1947 Jack "Flashgun" Casey was first introduced in the March 1934 issue of Black Mask, the classic pulp fiction magazine. Created by pulp wordsmith George Harmon Coxe, Casey appeared in dozens of stories in Black Mask, which were later collected into six books. Flashgun Casey came to radio as a CBS sustaining series on July 7, 1943. The series was renamed Casey, Press Photographer in 1944 and became Casey, Crime Photographer on September 12, 1945.

7:00 am – 7:30 am Gangbusters
close Gangbusters

"Jersey Butcher Bandits" from 11/8/1947 Gangbusters first came to radio under the title G-Men beginning July 20, 1935. The long-running series was created by Philip H. Lord and produced "in cooperation with police and federal law enforcement departments throughout the U.S. Gangbusters was one of radio's longest-running dramatic series, running from January 15, 1936 through November 27, 1957, and its classic opening gave rise to the expression "coming on like gangbusters."

7:30 am – 8:00 am Crime & Peter Chambers
close Crime & Peter Chambers

"Irene Wilson's Dead Uncle" from 9/7/1954 Dane Clark stars as Peter Chambers, a tough private eye that plays nice with the NYPD. The series is based on "Peter Chambers" novels, written by Henry Kane.

8:00 am – 9:00 am Philo Vance, Detective
close Philo Vance, Detective

"Alibi Murder Case" from 6/6/1950 ---- "One Cent Murder Case" from 7/12/1950 Philo Vance was the most popular fictional detective during the late 1920s and early 1930s and influenced the creation of many later detectives. S.S. Van Dine's legendary creation was first brought to radio on July 5, 1945 in an NBC summer series starring Jose Ferrar and was also briefly portrayed by John Emery.

9:00 am – 9:30 am Suspense
close Suspense

"Hide and Seek" from 5/13/1962 Suspense debuted on June 17, 1942 as a sustaining summer replacement, returned that fall and continued in the CBS lineup until September 30, 1962. "Radio's outstanding theatre of thrills" is recognized as one of the finest dramatic series in the history of broadcasting.

9:30 am – 10:00 am The Shadow
close The Shadow

"Death To The Shadow" from 3/12/1944 The Shadow debuted July 31, 1930 as the sinister narrator of CBS’ Street & Smith’s Detective Story Hour. The popularity of the phantom host led the nation’s largest publisher of pulp fiction to launch a mystery magazine devoted to The Shadow’s adventures.

10:00 am – 10:30 am Honest Harold
close Honest Harold

"Advertising Shark Repellent" from 10/4/1950 AKA "The Harold Peary Show" -- Peary, best known for his role as Gildersleeve on the Fibber McGee & Molly Show (and later on The Great Gildserleeve), starred in this short-lived sitcom. After acting as Gildersleeve on NBC for more than 10 years, Peary switched to CBS for this series, which only ran for one season. However, during the show's run, then-governor Earl Warren awarded Peary for his 10,000th radio broadcast (Warren later became Chief Justice of the US Supreme Court)

10:30 am – 11:00 am Great Gildersleeve
close Great Gildersleeve

"Leroy's Debt" from 10/14/1945 The Great Gildersleeve featured one of radio’s greatest casts of comedic players. The Great Gildersleeve aired until March 21, 1957, with Willard Waterman taking over the title role for the final seven radio season and three television seasons.

11:00 am – 11:30 am Fibber McGee & Molly
close Fibber McGee & Molly

"Fibber Quits Smoking" from 10/8/1940 The husband-and-wife vaudeville team of Jim and Marian Jordan began their radio careers in Peoria on a bet from Jim’s brother. The Jordans were heard as The O’Henry Twins and The Air Scouts before Don Quinn created Smackout in 1931. Quinn revamped the show as Fibber McGee and Molly in 1935 when Johnson’s Wax signed on as sponsor.

11:30 am – 12:00 pm Charlie McCarthy Show
close Charlie McCarthy Show

"Highlights From Bergen's Career" from 6/11/1953 Ventriloquist Edgar Bergen developed his Charlie McCarthy character in high school. Bergen performed with the newsboy dummy while attending Northwestern University and eventually left college to tour vaudeville. With the decline of vaudeville during the Great Depression, Bergen moved into night spots like New York’s trendy Rainbow Room but feared his friend wouldn’t be appreciated by high society. So he gave Charlie a monocle and top hat and a "man about town" was born. Following a three-month guest stint on Rudy Vallee’s show, Edgar Bergen was signed as headliner of The Chase and Sanborn Hour. The series premiered May 9, 1937 and ended the next three seasons as radio’s top-rated series.

12:00 pm – 1:00 pm When Radio Was
close When Radio Was

Radio Spirits' nationally syndicated radio program hosted by old-time radio expert Greg Bell

1:00 pm – 1:30 pm Romance of the Ranchos
close Romance of the Ranchos

"Joseph Chapman" from 1/7/1942 This historical drama told tales of early Southern California in "the days of the dons". Stories were based on records from Title Insurance, the show's sponsor. History was made as land changed hands and purposes, causing listeners to think twice about the stories behind their own West Coast land the in mid-1940s.

1:30 pm – 2:00 pm The Mysterious Traveler
close The Mysterious Traveler

"Man Who Knew Everything" from 10/9/1951 The Mysterious Traveler was one of radio's greatest omniscient storytellers, introducing tales of mystery, science fiction and horror from the typewriters of writers/producers Robert A. Arthur and David Kogan. The Mysterious Traveler rode the Mutual rails from December 5, 1943 through September 23, 1952.

2:00 pm – 2:30 pm Have Gun, Will Travel
close Have Gun, Will Travel

"British Courage" from 1/11/1959 Have Gun, Will Travel debuted on television on September 14, 1957 and moved to radio November 23, 1958. The program was an oddity, a western that began on television and moved to radio, featuring an ethical anti-hero whose mysterious origins were left untold until the fifth and final TV season.

2:30 pm – 3:00 pm Michael Shayne
close Michael Shayne

"Murder On The High C" from 5/7/1945 Detective Michael Shayne was created by Davis Dresser (writing under the pen name Brett Halliday). "Dividend of Death," the first of more than 60 novels featuring the Miami-based private detective was published in 1939. The adventures of the "reckless red-headed Irishman," played by Wally Maher, came to radio October 16, 1944 and aired for 3 years.

3:00 pm – 3:30 pm Man Called X
close Man Called X

"Cared Contraband" from 3/10/1951 Wherever there is mystery, adventure, intrigue, in all the strange and dangerous places in the world, there you will find--The Man Called X! Debonair British actor Herbert Marshall stars as FBI agent Ken Thurston, "the man who crosses the ocean as readily as you and I cross town; he is the man who fights today's war in his unique fashion, so that tomorrow's peace will make the world a neighborhood for all of us." The Man Called X debuted over CBS on July 10, 1944, moved to NBC in 1950 and continued through May 20, 1952.

3:30 pm – 4:00 pm Boston Blackie
close Boston Blackie

"Nothing Up My Sleeve" from 5/11/1949 Boston Blackie was created by Jack Boyle, a hard-drinking opium addict who served three prison terms. While in prison, Boyle began writing true-crime confession stories that were published in The American Magazine under the byline 6006, his convict number. Boyle's stories were collected in his 1919 book, Boston Blackie, and inspired a popular series of B-films, the radio series and a 1951 video version.

4:00 pm – 4:30 pm Life of Riley
close Life of Riley

"Launching Babs Into Society" from 5/3/1947 The Life of Riley featured the comic misadventures of riveter Chester A. Riley. Riley was a devoted family man with a talent for flying off the handle and a penchant for being worse. Movie star William Bendix played the title role of the lovable hardhat throughout the series.

4:30 pm – 5:00 pm Dennis Day Show
close Dennis Day Show

"City Manager" from 1/8/1949 Born Owen Patrick Eugene McNulty in an Irish family in the Bronx, Dennis Day first became known for his tenor voice as a replacement singer on Jack Benny's radio show on October 8, 1939. Benny and Day would remain friends and colleagues the rest of their lives. "A Day In The Life Of Dennis Day" aired on NBC from 1946-1951, while Day also regularly appeared on Benny's show singing, telling jokes, and performing impressions.

5:00 pm – 5:30 pm The Whistler
close The Whistler

"A Rose For Pamela" from 2/17/1952 The Whistler whistled its way onto the airwaves beginning May 16, 1942 and its eerie 13-note theme set the tone for West Coast radio mystery for the next decade. "I am the Whistler and I know many things, for I walk by night. I know many strange tales hidden in the hearts of men and women who have stepped into the shadows. Yes, I know the nameless terrors of which they dare not speak."

5:30 pm – 6:00 pm Have Gun, Will Travel
close Have Gun, Will Travel

"Comanche" from 7/5/1959 Have Gun, Will Travel debuted on television on September 14, 1957 and moved to radio November 23, 1958. The program was an oddity, a western that began on television and moved to radio, featuring an ethical anti-hero whose mysterious origins were left untold until the fifth and final TV season.

6:00 pm – 7:00 pm Dragnet
close Dragnet

"Big Mask (Week 1) " from 12/28/1952 ---- "Big Mask (Week 2)" from 1/4/1953 One of the most popular police dramas in the history of broadcasting, Dragnet aired on NBC Radio from June 10, 1949 through February 7, 1957 and on television from 1952-59 and 1967-72. Dragnet introduced a new era of documentary-style realism.

7:00 pm – 7:30 pm Adventures of Harry Nile
close Adventures of Harry Nile

"Box 111" from 2/10/2008 This series is one of a few modern series featured by Radio Classics. A creation of writer Jim French, Harry Nile first came to radio in 1976 and continued to be adapted into the late '90s as part of the "Imagination Theatre" productions. Harry Nile, a former Chicago cop turned private detective, was played by Phil Harper for more than 20 years.

7:30 pm – 8:00 pm The Green Hornet
close The Green Hornet

"Smuggler Signs His Name" from 11/25/1939 The Green Hornet debuted in Detroit on January 31, 1936. The Green Hornet was well-served by his valet Kato and a supercharged roadster, the Black Beauty. Al Hodge portrayed The Green Hornet during the series' first seven seasons, followed by Donovan Faust, Robert Hall and Jack McCarthy. The show ran on radio through December 5, 1952.

8:00 pm – 9:00 pm Lux Radio Theatre
close Lux Radio Theatre

"Alibi Ike" from 4/19/1937 The Lux Radio Theatre was one of radio's most popular series attracting Hollywood's top stars and boasting a lavish budget. The Lux Radio Theatre began in 1934 featuring dramas from Broadway, but there was not enough material to support the show. In an attempt to reverse the slipping ratings, the show was moved to Hollywood in 1936, where there was plenty of material and talent.

9:00 pm – 9:30 pm Yours Truly, Johnny Dollar
close Yours Truly, Johnny Dollar

"Virginia Beach Matter" from 8/31/1950 Yours Truly, Johnny Dollar told the story of the freelance insurance investigator with the "action-packed expense account." Radio’s last great detective series, Yours Truly, Johnny Dollar ended its run September 30, 1962 during the final week of network radio drama.

9:30 pm – 10:00 pm Gunsmoke
close Gunsmoke

"Letter Of The Law" from 7/15/1956 Radio’s greatest adult western told the story of Matt Dillon, U.S. Marshal, "the first man they look for and the last they want to meet." Gunsmoke grew out of a request from CBS founder William Paley for a "Philip Marlowe in the Old West," and featured grimly realistic stories set in the vicinity of Dodge City, the "Gommorrah of the West," with William Conrad as Dillon.

10:00 pm – 10:30 pm The Chase
close The Chase

"Flight From Istanbul" from 10/5/1952 This NBC thriller ran for about a year from the spring of 1952 to the summer of 1953. Each unique story entails suspense, action and, of course, a protagonist on the run. The series often featured guest stars who were announcers or actors for other suspenseful series, and many of the scripts were also used in other dramas like The Clock and Inner Sanctum Mysteries.

10:30 pm – 11:00 pm The Whistler
close The Whistler

"Shrunken Head" from 6/13/1942 The Whistler whistled its way onto the airwaves beginning May 16, 1942 and its eerie 13-note theme set the tone for West Coast radio mystery for the next decade. "I am the Whistler and I know many things, for I walk by night. I know many strange tales hidden in the hearts of men and women who have stepped into the shadows. Yes, I know the nameless terrors of which they dare not speak."

11:00 pm – 11:30 pm Quiet, Please
close Quiet, Please

"Dark Rosaleen" from 3/13/1949 Quiet Please was one of radio’s most imaginative series, created and written by Wyllis Cooper, the talented writer/director who created radio’s legendary Lights Out in 1934 and scripted the 1939 horror film The Son of Frankenstein. Ernest Chappell starred in the series, narrating the stories in a quiet, underplayed conversational tone. Quiet Please aired over the Mutual airwaves from June 8, 1947 through September 13, 1948 and over ABC from September 19, 1948 through June 25, 1949.

11:30 pm – Tuesday Midnight Lum and Abner
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"Magazine Article About Rocket" from 11/24/1942 Chester Lauck and Norris Goff were first heard as Lum and Abner on a radio fundraiser for flood victims. Improvising the spot, they went on the air as the "fellers from the hills" and won a regular spot on KTHS beginning April 26, 1931. Lum and Abner moved into an NBC summer berth July 27, 1931 and aired nationally from May 22, 1933 through May 7, 1954.

Wednesday 7/26
12:00 am – 12:30 am Further Adventures of Sherlock Holmes
close Further Adventures of Sherlock Holmes

"The Godolphin Arabian" from 11/23/2003 Jim French wrote this modern adaptation of mystery's most famous detective as part of the Imagination Theatre productions. These plays were produced and aired in the '00s. John Patrick Lowrie plays Holmes and Lawrence Albert portrays Watson.

12:30 am – 1:00 am Adventures of Frank Race
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"The Gold Worshiper" from 3/24/1945 Frank Race is an attorney whose life is filled with intrigue following the war. The adventure series aired from 1949 to 1950. Starring Tom Collins and then Paul Dobov.

1:00 am – 1:30 am The Six Shooter
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"Battle At Tower Rock" from 2/21/1954 The Six Shooter aired started movie star James Stewart rode the radio range from September 20, 1953 through June 24, 1954 as Britt Ponset, "the Texas plainsman who wandered through the western territories, leaving behind a trail of still-remembered legends."

1:30 am – 2:00 am Gunsmoke
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"Long As I Live" from 12/8/1957 Radio’s greatest adult western told the story of Matt Dillon, U.S. Marshal, "the first man they look for and the last they want to meet." Gunsmoke grew out of a request from CBS founder William Paley for a "Philip Marlowe in the Old West," and featured grimly realistic stories set in the vicinity of Dodge City, the "Gommorrah of the West," with William Conrad as Dillon.

2:00 am – 2:30 am Everyman's Theatre
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"The Cat Wife" from 10/18/1940

2:30 am – 3:00 am Inner Sanctum Mysteries
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"Terrible Vengeance" from 6/14/1942 Inner Sanctum's sinister host welcomed listeners "through the squeaking door to another night of horror." The show’s "squeaking door" was one of radio’s most-remembered openings and was inspired by the creaking hinges on a sound effects door at the radio studio.

3:00 am – 3:30 am Cloak & Dagger
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"File 2218" from 5/7/1950 These tense plotlines revolved around the wartime activities of the U.S. government's Office of Strategic Services. Stories were based on true adventure tales by Corey Ford and Alastair MacBain. It ran on NBC for about 6 months from May - October 1950.

3:30 am – 4:00 am Don Winslow Of The Navy
close Don Winslow Of The Navy

"Japanese Mini-Sub" from 10/7/1942

4:00 am – 5:00 am Suspense
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"Give Me Liberty" from 10/21/1948 --- "The Man Who Cried Wolf" from 2/9/1953 Suspense debuted on June 17, 1942 as a sustaining summer replacement, returned that fall and continued in the CBS lineup until September 30, 1962. "Radio's outstanding theatre of thrills" is recognized as one of the finest dramatic series in the history of broadcasting.

5:00 am – 5:30 am Screen Director's Playhouse
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"Love Crazy" from 8/19/1949 The Screen Director's Playhouse featured adaptations of famous movies and called upon the screen directors to introduce and highlight their work. After each show, the director and stars gathered around the microphones to reminisce about the actual making of the film.

5:30 am – 6:00 am Life With Luigi
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"Pascuale's Birthday" from 6/19/1949 Longtime Hollywood character actor J. Carrol Naish became a radio star in his own right after nearly two decades toiling in the background in such films as Beau Geste, House of Frankenstein and the Batman movie serial. The native New Yorker of Irish descent finally won fame as "the little Italian immigrant" who each week wrote of his American adventures to his mama in Italy. Life with Luigi aired from September 21, 1948 through March 3, 1953 on radio, and the radio cast briefly did double duty in a short-lived 1952 television version.

6:00 am – 6:30 am Mail Call
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"State Of Maine Tribute (Fred Allen)" from 8/9/1944

6:30 am – 7:00 am Duffy's Tavern
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"George Jessel & Rudy Vallee" from 11/5/1947 Millions of radio listeners visited Duffy's Tavern each week, but Duffy himself was nowhere to be found. Although he dutifully phoned Archie the manager each week, he never once dropped by. Duffy's Tavern first opened its doors to radio listeners on the CBS audition series Forecast on July 29, 1940, and then opened for regular business on March 1, 1941.

7:00 am – 7:40 am The Bickersons
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"Blanche Has A Stomach Ache" from 3/2/1947

7:40 am – 8:00 am Vic & Sade
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"Aunt Bess" from 6/15/1944 Vic and Sade aired from June 29, 1932 through December 7, 1945 and was briefly revived in a half-hour sitcom format in 1946. "Radio’s home folks" were featured in slice-of-life situations that painted a rich portrait of small-town life. Starring Art Van Harvey and Bernardine Flynn.

8:00 am – 9:00 am The Shadow
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"The Phantom Fingerprints" from 10/29/1939 --- "Dream Of Death" from 11/9/1947 The Shadow debuted July 31, 1930 as the sinister narrator of CBS’ Street & Smith’s Detective Story Hour. The popularity of the phantom host led the nation’s largest publisher of pulp fiction to launch a mystery magazine devoted to The Shadow’s adventures.

9:00 am – 9:30 am The Weird Circle
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"The Rope Of Hair" from 4/16/1944 This horror series consisted mostly of adapted supernatural tales from greats like Edgar Allen Poe and Robert Louis Stevenson. It aired for two seasons from 1943-1945, first on Mutual and then on NBC's Red network.

9:30 am – 10:00 am The Falcon
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"The Broken Key" from 7/24/1952 Michael Waring was a freelance detective who was also known as the Falcon. Waring's detective techniques were a cross between Ellery Queen and Richard Diamond. He had a certain eye for detail but was frequently on the outs with the police.

10:00 am – 10:30 am Suspense
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"Want Ad" from 7/11/1956 Suspense debuted on June 17, 1942 as a sustaining summer replacement, returned that fall and continued in the CBS lineup until September 30, 1962. "Radio's outstanding theatre of thrills" is recognized as one of the finest dramatic series in the history of broadcasting.

10:30 am – 11:00 am This Is Your F.B.I
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"Jungle Killer" from 12/15/1950 This Is Your F.B.I. came to the Blue Network on April 6, 1945, created, produced and directed by Jerry Devine, a former child actor. Like Philips H. Lord before him, Devine got special permission from bureau head J. Edgar Hoover to dramatize older cases using fictitious names and locales. Frank Lovejoy was the program's first narrator, followed by Dean Carlton and later William Woodson.

11:00 am – 11:30 am Escape - Radio Classics
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"Dream of Armageddon" from 9/5/1948 Radio's greatest series of high adventure debuted over the CBS network on July 7,1947. Escape's protagonists faced life-and-death situations each week, as the show careened from classic adventure to Western drama to science fiction. The program was broadcast as a sustainer (unsponsored) series during most of its seven-year run.

11:30 am – 12:00 pm The Shadow
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"Death On The Rails" from 4/13/1941 The Shadow debuted July 31, 1930 as the sinister narrator of CBS’ Street & Smith’s Detective Story Hour. The popularity of the phantom host led the nation’s largest publisher of pulp fiction to launch a mystery magazine devoted to The Shadow’s adventures.

12:00 pm – 1:00 pm When Radio Was
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Radio Spirits' nationally syndicated radio program hosted by old-time radio expert Greg Bell

1:00 pm – 1:30 pm Dimension X
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"Universe" from 8/2/1951 Dimension X aired over NBC from April 8, 1950 through September 29, 1951 featuring "adventures in time and space told in future tense." The series adapted stories by the modern masters of science fiction adapting works by Isaac Asimov, Ray Bradbury, Robert Heinlein, Clifford Simak, Theodore Sturgeon and many others.

1:30 pm – 2:00 pm Escape - Radio Classics
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"Young Man With Cream Tarts" 11/12/1947 Radio's greatest series of high adventure debuted over the CBS network on July 7,1947. Escape's protagonists faced life-and-death situations each week, as the show careened from classic adventure to Western drama to science fiction. The program was broadcast as a sustainer (unsponsored) series during most of its seven-year run.

2:00 pm – 3:00 pm Lux Radio Theatre
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"The Show-Off" from 2/1/1943 The Lux Radio Theatre was one of radio's most popular series attracting Hollywood's top stars and boasting a lavish budget. The Lux Radio Theatre began in 1934 featuring dramas from Broadway, but there was not enough material to support the show. In an attempt to reverse the slipping ratings, the show was moved to Hollywood in 1936, where there was plenty of material and talent.

3:00 pm – 3:30 pm Great Gildersleeve
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"Arrives In Summerfield (Premiere)" from 8/31/1941 The Great Gildersleeve featured one of radio’s greatest casts of comedic players. The Great Gildersleeve aired until March 21, 1957, with Willard Waterman taking over the title role for the final seven radio season and three television seasons.

3:30 pm – 4:00 pm Fibber McGee & Molly
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"Five Tons Of Coal" from 12/3/1940 The husband-and-wife vaudeville team of Jim and Marian Jordan began their radio careers in Peoria on a bet from Jim’s brother. The Jordans were heard as The O’Henry Twins and The Air Scouts before Don Quinn created Smackout in 1931. Quinn revamped the show as Fibber McGee and Molly in 1935 when Johnson’s Wax signed on as sponsor.

4:00 pm – 5:00 pm Burns & Allen Show
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"Quiz Show" from 9/26/1946 --- Guest: Jack Benny (Gypsy Band) from 1/8/1948 George and Gracie first performed on air over the BBC while touring England after an NBC executive rejected their act insisting that "Gracie’s voice is unfit for radio." Burns and Allen won a regular spot on The Robert Burns Panatella Program February 22, 1932 and moved into the top spot when Guy Lombardo left the series. The Burns and Allen Show aired through May 17, 1950 on radio and for another decade on television. Jack Benny and George Burns were best friends in real life and often were guests on each other’s programs.

5:00 pm – 5:30 pm Jack Benny Program
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Guest: Burns & Allen from 1/15/1947 For more than 20 years, Jack Benny reigned as the king of radio comedy. His show ran on nearly every network from 1932 to the mid 1950s. How he turned a miserable, self-absorbed cheapskate into a beloved icon ranks among the great achievements in entertainment history. Benny revolutionized the way humor was played on radio by introducing the situation comedy and by giving most of the best lines to his supporting cast.

5:30 pm – 5:45 pm The Bickersons
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"John's Wrecked Car" from 2/23/1947

5:45 pm – 6:00 pm Baby Snooks
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"Red Cross Exam" from 3/26/1942 Baby Snooks was born at a Detroit party when Fanny Brice, then performing burlesque, sang "Poor Pauline" in a little-girl voice, and was revived for her first radio broadcasts in the '30s. Frank Morgan and Alan Reed served as Snooks’ foils on early broadcasts before Hanley Stafford became radio’s longest-running "Daddy." The Baby Snooks Show aired from September 17, 1944 through May 29, 1951, with Stafford delivering a moving eulogy on the final show following Brice’s death from a cerebral hemorrhage.

6:00 pm – 6:30 pm Burns & Allen Show
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"Gracie Tries To Hypnotize George" from 1/31/1946 George and Gracie first performed on air over the BBC while touring England after an NBC executive rejected their act insisting that "Gracie’s voice is unfit for radio." Burns and Allen won a regular spot on The Robert Burns Panatella Program February 22, 1932 and moved into the top spot when Guy Lombardo left the series. The Burns and Allen Show aired through May 17, 1950 on radio and for another decade on television. Jack Benny and George Burns were best friends in real life and often were guests on each other’s programs.

6:30 pm – 7:00 pm Jack Benny Program
close Jack Benny Program

"Gracie Visits (Running For President)" from 3/3/1940 For more than 20 years, Jack Benny reigned as the king of radio comedy. His show ran on nearly every network from 1932 to the mid 1950s. How he turned a miserable, self-absorbed cheapskate into a beloved icon ranks among the great achievements in entertainment history. Benny revolutionized the way humor was played on radio by introducing the situation comedy and by giving most of the best lines to his supporting cast.

7:00 pm – 8:00 pm Burns & Allen Show
close Burns & Allen Show

"Gracie's Problem With Salesmen" from 5/13/1948 --- "Gracie Turns House Into Office" from 2/27/1947 George and Gracie first performed on air over the BBC while touring England after an NBC executive rejected their act insisting that "Gracie’s voice is unfit for radio." Burns and Allen won a regular spot on The Robert Burns Panatella Program February 22, 1932 and moved into the top spot when Guy Lombardo left the series. The Burns and Allen Show aired through May 17, 1950 on radio and for another decade on television. Jack Benny and George Burns were best friends in real life and often were guests on each other’s programs.

8:00 pm – 8:30 pm The Line-Up
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"The Holstedter Case" from 12/21/1950 This CBS cop procedural pulls back the curtain on crime fighting in San Francisco. The Shadow's Bill Johnstone starred as cool-mannered Lt. Ben Guthrie, foil to hot-tempered Sgt. Matt Grebb. Director Elliot Lewis was one of the busiest men in radio, having a hand in the Phil Harris & Alice Faye Show, Suspense, Broadway Is My Beat, and many more.

8:30 pm – 9:00 pm Richard Diamond, Private Detective
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"The Carnival" from 3/30/1951 Richard Diamond, Private Detective premiered over the NBC network on April 24, 1949 and ran through 1952 starring Dick Powell as "radio's singing detective." Powell had first achieved movie stardom as a baby-faced crooner, and later matured to hardboiled roles, including Raymond Chandler's Philip Marlowe in the 1944 film Murder My Sweet.

9:00 pm – 9:30 pm Alan Young Show
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"Smashed Fender" from 2/8/1946 This sitcom aired from 1944-1949, first as a summer replacement series for Eddie Cantor's show. Then, after signing on as a regular on the Jimmy Durante show, young scored his own show with Tums as a sponsor. Today he is best known as TV's Wilbur Post, who talked with Mr. Ed the horse.

9:30 pm – 10:00 pm Great Gildersleeve
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"Gildy Picks Husband For Marjorie" from 5/6/1945 The Great Gildersleeve featured one of radio’s greatest casts of comedic players. The Great Gildersleeve aired until March 21, 1957, with Willard Waterman taking over the title role for the final seven radio season and three television seasons.

10:00 pm – 11:00 pm CBS Radio Workshop
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"Brave New World" from 1/27/1956 The CBS Radio Workshop aired from January 27, 1956 through September 22, 1957 and was a revival of the prestigious Columbia Workshop from the 1930s and 1940s. The CBS Workshop regularly featured the works of the world’s greatest writers. including Ray Bradbury, Archibald MacLeish, William Saroyan, Lord Dunsany and Ambrose Bierce.

11:00 pm – 11:30 pm Columbia Workshop
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"Brucie & Willie" from 10/12/1946 Also known as the CBS Radio Workshop, this was an experimental anthology series that pushed the envelope of defining art with its creative use of sound. It featured many New York actors and scripts by some of the country's best writers. It aired in various forms on CBS from 1936 - 1957

11:30 pm – Wednesday Midnight Police Headquarters
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"Boxing Match Death" from 1932 This police procedural series was syndicated on NBC stations in 1932. It features quarter-hour stories typically based on true crimes.

Thursday 7/27
12:00 am – 12:30 am The Green Hornet
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"The Cigarette Filters" from 11/19/1952 The Green Hornet debuted in Detroit on January 31, 1936. The Green Hornet was well-served by his valet Kato and a supercharged roadster, the Black Beauty. Al Hodge portrayed The Green Hornet during the series' first seven seasons, followed by Donovan Faust, Robert Hall and Jack McCarthy. The show ran on radio through December 5, 1952.

12:30 am – 1:00 am Casey, Crime Photographer
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"Treasure Cave" from 9/25/1947 Jack "Flashgun" Casey was first introduced in the March 1934 issue of Black Mask, the classic pulp fiction magazine. Created by pulp wordsmith George Harmon Coxe, Casey appeared in dozens of stories in Black Mask, which were later collected into six books. Flashgun Casey came to radio as a CBS sustaining series on July 7, 1943. The series was renamed Casey, Press Photographer in 1944 and became Casey, Crime Photographer on September 12, 1945.

1:00 am – 1:30 am Gangbusters
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"Jersey Butcher Bandits" from 11/8/1947 Gangbusters first came to radio under the title G-Men beginning July 20, 1935. The long-running series was created by Philip H. Lord and produced "in cooperation with police and federal law enforcement departments throughout the U.S. Gangbusters was one of radio's longest-running dramatic series, running from January 15, 1936 through November 27, 1957, and its classic opening gave rise to the expression "coming on like gangbusters."

1:30 am – 2:00 am Crime & Peter Chambers
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"Irene Wilson's Dead Uncle" from 9/7/1954 Dane Clark stars as Peter Chambers, a tough private eye that plays nice with the NYPD. The series is based on "Peter Chambers" novels, written by Henry Kane.

2:00 am – 2:30 am Have Gun, Will Travel
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"British Courage" from 1/11/1959 Have Gun, Will Travel debuted on television on September 14, 1957 and moved to radio November 23, 1958. The program was an oddity, a western that began on television and moved to radio, featuring an ethical anti-hero whose mysterious origins were left untold until the fifth and final TV season.

2:30 am – 3:00 am Michael Shayne
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"Murder On The High C" from 5/7/1945 Detective Michael Shayne was created by Davis Dresser (writing under the pen name Brett Halliday). "Dividend of Death," the first of more than 60 novels featuring the Miami-based private detective was published in 1939. The adventures of the "reckless red-headed Irishman," played by Wally Maher, came to radio October 16, 1944 and aired for 3 years.

3:00 am – 3:30 am Man Called X
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"Cared Contraband" from 3/10/1951 Wherever there is mystery, adventure, intrigue, in all the strange and dangerous places in the world, there you will find--The Man Called X! Debonair British actor Herbert Marshall stars as FBI agent Ken Thurston, "the man who crosses the ocean as readily as you and I cross town; he is the man who fights today's war in his unique fashion, so that tomorrow's peace will make the world a neighborhood for all of us." The Man Called X debuted over CBS on July 10, 1944, moved to NBC in 1950 and continued through May 20, 1952.

3:30 am – 4:00 am Boston Blackie
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"Nothing Up My Sleeve" from 5/11/1949 Boston Blackie was created by Jack Boyle, a hard-drinking opium addict who served three prison terms. While in prison, Boyle began writing true-crime confession stories that were published in The American Magazine under the byline 6006, his convict number. Boyle's stories were collected in his 1919 book, Boston Blackie, and inspired a popular series of B-films, the radio series and a 1951 video version.

4:00 am – 4:30 am Night Beat
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"Old Blind Pop" from 8/7/1950 Frank Lovejoy is heard as Randy "Lucky" Stone, a hardboiled reporter who covers the "nightbeat" for the Chicago Star. Randy Stone wandered the back alleys and bars of Chicago, searching for both crime and human-interest stories. Nightbeat premiered on February 6, 1950 and ran until September 25, 1952.

4:30 am – 5:00 am The Third Man
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"Cherches La Gem" from 1/4/1952 The Third Man was an adventure series starring Orson Welles as Harry Lime, the character created by author Graham Greene. It first aired on the BBC in 1951 and was then syndicated for American radio in 1952.

5:00 am – 5:30 am I Was A Communist for the FBI
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"Home Improvements" from 11/26/1953 I Was a Communist for the FBI--I walk alone. The 1952 syndicated series starred Dana Andrews as real-life undercover agent Matt Cvetic, whose book of the same title provided the inspiration for the radio series and a Hollywood film. Growing out of the communist paranoia of the McCarthy era, the Cold War drama featured red spies portrayed in the same stereotypical manner of the Nazis during World Ward II propaganda programs.

5:30 am – 6:00 am Tales of the Texas Rangers
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"Death By Adoption" from 3/18/1951 Tales of the Texas Rangers was broadcast over NBC from July 8 1950 through September 14, 1952 and was later revived on television. Western film star Joel McCrea portrayed Ranger Jace Pearson in NBC's Tales of the Texas Rangers.

6:00 am – 6:30 am Red Skelton Show
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"A Day At The Beach" from 4/16/1950 The Red Skelton Show came to NBC on October 7, 1941 after years as a mainstay on Cincinnati's powerhouse station WLW. Red scored with radio audiences as Junior, "the mean widdle kid," a character he originated in vaudeville. Some of his other memorable characters included Deadeye, J. Newton Numbskull, Willie Lump-Lump, Bolivar Shagnasty and Clem Kadiddlehopper.

6:30 am – 7:00 am Phil Harris & Alice Faye Show
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"Who Will Replace Phil?" from 3/22/1953 The Phil Harris & Alice Faye Show grew out of the popular Fitch Bandwagon series. Phil Harris played himself, continuing the egotistical, smart-alec characterization he had perfected during his years as Jack Bennys' bandleader. Alice Faye, Phil's movie star wife, recreated her real-life role as a film star turn devoted housewife.

7:00 am – 7:30 am An American Gallery
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"A Day To Test, A Day To Learn" from the 1960s Each episode featured the work of a different American artist, mostly musicians, across all genres. The narrator was often also a celebrity, such as Bing Crosby speaking about Louis Armstrong and jazz.

7:30 am – 8:00 am CBS Radio Workshop
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"Meditations On Ecclesiastes" from 6/23/1957 The CBS Radio Workshop aired from January 27, 1956 through September 22, 1957 and was a revival of the prestigious Columbia Workshop from the 1930s and 1940s. The CBS Workshop regularly featured the works of the world’s greatest writers. including Ray Bradbury, Archibald MacLeish, William Saroyan, Lord Dunsany and Ambrose Bierce.

8:00 am – 8:30 am Life of Riley
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"Launching Babs Into Society" from 5/3/1947 The Life of Riley featured the comic misadventures of riveter Chester A. Riley. Riley was a devoted family man with a talent for flying off the handle and a penchant for being worse. Movie star William Bendix played the title role of the lovable hardhat throughout the series.

8:30 am – 9:00 am Dennis Day Show
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"City Manager" from 1/8/1949 Born Owen Patrick Eugene McNulty in an Irish family in the Bronx, Dennis Day first became known for his tenor voice as a replacement singer on Jack Benny's radio show on October 8, 1939. Benny and Day would remain friends and colleagues the rest of their lives. "A Day In The Life Of Dennis Day" aired on NBC from 1946-1951, while Day also regularly appeared on Benny's show singing, telling jokes, and performing impressions.

9:00 am – 9:30 am The Whistler
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"A Rose For Pamela" from 2/17/1952 The Whistler whistled its way onto the airwaves beginning May 16, 1942 and its eerie 13-note theme set the tone for West Coast radio mystery for the next decade. "I am the Whistler and I know many things, for I walk by night. I know many strange tales hidden in the hearts of men and women who have stepped into the shadows. Yes, I know the nameless terrors of which they dare not speak."

9:30 am – 10:00 am Have Gun, Will Travel
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"Comanche" from 7/5/1959 Have Gun, Will Travel debuted on television on September 14, 1957 and moved to radio November 23, 1958. The program was an oddity, a western that began on television and moved to radio, featuring an ethical anti-hero whose mysterious origins were left untold until the fifth and final TV season.

10:00 am – 10:30 am The Family Theater
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"In Another Year" from 1/1/1948 Some of the biggest names in radio and film star in this dramatic anthology for the whole family from the Mutual Broadcasting System. It was originally created by Father Patrick Peyton of the Holy Cross Fathers to promote fmaily unity and prayer. Networks refused to air it with its one-denominational focus, so it was transformed to a star-studded weekly drama and the religious messages aired instead of commercials.

10:30 am – 11:00 am Behind The Mike
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"Zulu Radio Star" from 10/12/1941 "Radio's own show" first ran in 1931 as a 15-minute show, then revamped in 1940 as a half-hour program, hosted by Graham McNamee. Episodes could feature interviews with inventors, producers, show runners and actors, sharing behind-the-scenes stories of how radio shows get made.

11:00 am – 11:30 am Nick Carter, Master Detective
close Nick Carter, Master Detective

"Double Disguise" from 1/8/1944 Nick Carter was the first great detective fiction series. The character of Nick Carter was created by dime novelist John Russell Coryell in his 1886 story, "The Old Detective's Pupil." Nick Carter, Master Detective debuted on April 11, 1943 and ended its long radio run on September 25, 1955.

11:30 am – 12:00 pm Boston Blackie
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"Three Witnesses Killed" from 6/4/1946 Boston Blackie was created by Jack Boyle, a hard-drinking opium addict who served three prison terms. While in prison, Boyle began writing true-crime confession stories that were published in The American Magazine under the byline 6006, his convict number. Boyle's stories were collected in his 1919 book, Boston Blackie, and inspired a popular series of B-films, the radio series and a 1951 video version.

12:00 pm – 1:00 pm When Radio Was
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Radio Spirits' nationally syndicated radio program hosted by old-time radio expert Greg Bell

1:00 pm – 1:30 pm Romance of the Ranchos
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"Joseph Chapman" from 1/7/1942 This historical drama told tales of early Southern California in "the days of the dons". Stories were based on records from Title Insurance, the show's sponsor. History was made as land changed hands and purposes, causing listeners to think twice about the stories behind their own West Coast land the in mid-1940s.

1:30 pm – 2:00 pm The Mysterious Traveler
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"Man Who Knew Everything" from 10/9/1951 The Mysterious Traveler was one of radio's greatest omniscient storytellers, introducing tales of mystery, science fiction and horror from the typewriters of writers/producers Robert A. Arthur and David Kogan. The Mysterious Traveler rode the Mutual rails from December 5, 1943 through September 23, 1952.

2:00 pm – 3:30 pm Suspense
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"Walls Came Tumbling Down" 6/29/1944 "The Night Reveals" 4/18/1946 "I Had An Alibi" 1/4/1945 Suspense debuted on June 17, 1942 as a sustaining summer replacement, returned that fall and continued in the CBS lineup until September 30, 1962. "Radio's outstanding theatre of thrills" is recognized as one of the finest dramatic series in the history of broadcasting.

3:30 pm – 4:00 pm Charlie McCarthy Show
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"With Keenan Wynn & Anne Baxter" from 9/23/1945 Ventriloquist Edgar Bergen developed his Charlie McCarthy character in high school. Bergen performed with the newsboy dummy while attending Northwestern University and eventually left college to tour vaudeville. With the decline of vaudeville during the Great Depression, Bergen moved into night spots like New York’s trendy Rainbow Room but feared his friend wouldn’t be appreciated by high society. So he gave Charlie a monocle and top hat and a "man about town" was born. Following a three-month guest stint on Rudy Vallee’s show, Edgar Bergen was signed as headliner of The Chase and Sanborn Hour. The series premiered May 9, 1937 and ended the next three seasons as radio’s top-rated series.

4:00 pm – 5:00 pm Adventures of Philip Marlowe
close Adventures of Philip Marlowe

"The Fatted Calf" from 9/24/1949 ---- "Girl From Pitchfork Corners" from 7/5/1950 Raymond Chandler introduced readers to Philip Marlowe in his 1939 novel The Big Sleep. Humphrey Bogart, Robert Montgomery and George Montgomery portrayed the hardboiled detective in films before Van Heflin took over as Marlowe in NBC’s 1947 summer series.The Adventures of Philip Marlowe returned September 26, 1948, as a CBS series and starred Gerald Mohr. CBS Chairman William S. Paley was a big fan of The Adventures of Philip Marlowe, and his request for a "Philip Marlowe in the West" led to the development of the legendary western Gunsmoke.

5:00 pm – 5:30 pm Dimension X
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"Nightmare" from 6/10/1951 Dimension X aired over NBC from April 8, 1950 through September 29, 1951 featuring "adventures in time and space told in future tense." The series adapted stories by the modern masters of science fiction adapting works by Isaac Asimov, Ray Bradbury, Robert Heinlein, Clifford Simak, Theodore Sturgeon and many others.

5:30 pm – 6:00 pm X Minus One
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"Reluctant Heroes" from 12/19/1956 X-Minus One premiered on April 24, 195 and was a revival of Dimension X, NBC's earlier science fiction anthology series. X-Minus One ran until January 9, 1958 and was rerun during the 1970s as part of NBC's Omnibus series.

6:00 pm – 6:30 pm The Mysterious Traveler
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"Man Who Tried To Save Lincoln" from 2/7/1950 The Mysterious Traveler was one of radio's greatest omniscient storytellers, introducing tales of mystery, science fiction and horror from the typewriters of writers/producers Robert A. Arthur and David Kogan. The Mysterious Traveler rode the Mutual rails from December 5, 1943 through September 23, 1952.

6:30 pm – 7:00 pm The Whistler
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"Letters From Aaron Burr" from 11/20/1949 The Whistler whistled its way onto the airwaves beginning May 16, 1942 and its eerie 13-note theme set the tone for West Coast radio mystery for the next decade. "I am the Whistler and I know many things, for I walk by night. I know many strange tales hidden in the hearts of men and women who have stepped into the shadows. Yes, I know the nameless terrors of which they dare not speak."

7:00 pm – 7:30 pm Gunsmoke
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"Rock Bottom" from 4/7/1957 Radio’s greatest adult western told the story of Matt Dillon, U.S. Marshal, "the first man they look for and the last they want to meet." Gunsmoke grew out of a request from CBS founder William Paley for a "Philip Marlowe in the Old West," and featured grimly realistic stories set in the vicinity of Dodge City, the "Gommorrah of the West," with William Conrad as Dillon.

7:30 pm – 8:00 pm Romance of the Ranchos
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"Phineas Banning" from 3/8/1942 This historical drama told tales of early Southern California in "the days of the dons". Stories were based on records from Title Insurance, the show's sponsor. History was made as land changed hands and purposes, causing listeners to think twice about the stories behind their own West Coast land the in mid-1940s.

8:00 pm – 8:30 pm Fred Allen Show
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Guest: Leo Durocher from 12/2/1945 John Steinbeck recognized Fred Allen as "unquestionably the best humorist of our time, a brilliant critic of manners and morals." Following in the footsteps of Will Rogers, Fred reintroduced topical political humor to radio. Fred introduced his classic "Allen’s Alley" segment December 13, 1942.

8:30 pm – 9:00 pm Jack Benny Program
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Guest: Leo Durocher from 11/9/1941 For more than 20 years, Jack Benny reigned as the king of radio comedy. His show ran on nearly every network from 1932 to the mid 1950s. How he turned a miserable, self-absorbed cheapskate into a beloved icon ranks among the great achievements in entertainment history. Benny revolutionized the way humor was played on radio by introducing the situation comedy and by giving most of the best lines to his supporting cast.

9:00 pm – 9:30 pm Life of Riley
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"Cissie & Lionel" from 1/20/1950 The Life of Riley featured the comic misadventures of riveter Chester A. Riley. Riley was a devoted family man with a talent for flying off the handle and a penchant for being worse. Movie star William Bendix played the title role of the lovable hardhat throughout the series.

9:30 pm – 10:00 pm Dennis Day Show
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"Room For Rent" from 9/25/1948 Born Owen Patrick Eugene McNulty in an Irish family in the Bronx, Dennis Day first became known for his tenor voice as a replacement singer on Jack Benny's radio show on October 8, 1939. Benny and Day would remain friends and colleagues the rest of their lives. "A Day In The Life Of Dennis Day" aired on NBC from 1946-1951, while Day also regularly appeared on Benny's show singing, telling jokes, and performing impressions.

10:00 pm – 11:30 pm Yours Truly, Johnny Dollar
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"Lansing Fraud Matter" from 12/12/1955 Yours Truly, Johnny Dollar told the story of the freelance insurance investigator with the "action-packed expense account." Radio’s last great detective series, Yours Truly, Johnny Dollar ended its run September 30, 1962 during the final week of network radio drama.

11:30 pm – Thursday Midnight Dark Venture
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"Pursuit" from 7/31/1945

Friday 7/28
12:00 am – 1:00 am Dragnet
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"Big Mask (Week 1) " from 12/28/1952 ---- "Big Mask (Week 2)" from 1/4/1953 One of the most popular police dramas in the history of broadcasting, Dragnet aired on NBC Radio from June 10, 1949 through February 7, 1957 and on television from 1952-59 and 1967-72. Dragnet introduced a new era of documentary-style realism.

1:00 am – 1:30 am Adventures of Harry Nile
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"Box 111" from 2/10/2008 This series is one of a few modern series featured by Radio Classics. A creation of writer Jim French, Harry Nile first came to radio in 1976 and continued to be adapted into the late '90s as part of the "Imagination Theatre" productions. Harry Nile, a former Chicago cop turned private detective, was played by Phil Harper for more than 20 years.

1:30 am – 2:00 am The Green Hornet
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"Smuggler Signs His Name" from 11/25/1939 The Green Hornet debuted in Detroit on January 31, 1936. The Green Hornet was well-served by his valet Kato and a supercharged roadster, the Black Beauty. Al Hodge portrayed The Green Hornet during the series' first seven seasons, followed by Donovan Faust, Robert Hall and Jack McCarthy. The show ran on radio through December 5, 1952.

2:00 am – 2:30 am The Chase
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"Flight From Istanbul" from 10/5/1952 This NBC thriller ran for about a year from the spring of 1952 to the summer of 1953. Each unique story entails suspense, action and, of course, a protagonist on the run. The series often featured guest stars who were announcers or actors for other suspenseful series, and many of the scripts were also used in other dramas like The Clock and Inner Sanctum Mysteries.

2:30 am – 3:00 am The Whistler
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"Shrunken Head" from 6/13/1942 The Whistler whistled its way onto the airwaves beginning May 16, 1942 and its eerie 13-note theme set the tone for West Coast radio mystery for the next decade. "I am the Whistler and I know many things, for I walk by night. I know many strange tales hidden in the hearts of men and women who have stepped into the shadows. Yes, I know the nameless terrors of which they dare not speak."

3:00 am – 3:30 am Quiet, Please
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"Dark Rosaleen" from 3/13/1949 Quiet Please was one of radio’s most imaginative series, created and written by Wyllis Cooper, the talented writer/director who created radio’s legendary Lights Out in 1934 and scripted the 1939 horror film The Son of Frankenstein. Ernest Chappell starred in the series, narrating the stories in a quiet, underplayed conversational tone. Quiet Please aired over the Mutual airwaves from June 8, 1947 through September 13, 1948 and over ABC from September 19, 1948 through June 25, 1949.

3:30 am – 4:00 am Lum and Abner
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"Magazine Article About Rocket" from 11/24/1942 Chester Lauck and Norris Goff were first heard as Lum and Abner on a radio fundraiser for flood victims. Improvising the spot, they went on the air as the "fellers from the hills" and won a regular spot on KTHS beginning April 26, 1931. Lum and Abner moved into an NBC summer berth July 27, 1931 and aired nationally from May 22, 1933 through May 7, 1954.

4:00 am – 4:30 am Honest Harold
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"Advertising Shark Repellent" from 10/4/1950 AKA "The Harold Peary Show" -- Peary, best known for his role as Gildersleeve on the Fibber McGee & Molly Show (and later on The Great Gildserleeve), starred in this short-lived sitcom. After acting as Gildersleeve on NBC for more than 10 years, Peary switched to CBS for this series, which only ran for one season. However, during the show's run, then-governor Earl Warren awarded Peary for his 10,000th radio broadcast (Warren later became Chief Justice of the US Supreme Court)

4:30 am – 5:00 am Great Gildersleeve
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"Leroy's Debt" from 10/14/1945 The Great Gildersleeve featured one of radio’s greatest casts of comedic players. The Great Gildersleeve aired until March 21, 1957, with Willard Waterman taking over the title role for the final seven radio season and three television seasons.

5:00 am – 5:30 am Fibber McGee & Molly
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"Fibber Quits Smoking" from 10/8/1940 The husband-and-wife vaudeville team of Jim and Marian Jordan began their radio careers in Peoria on a bet from Jim’s brother. The Jordans were heard as The O’Henry Twins and The Air Scouts before Don Quinn created Smackout in 1931. Quinn revamped the show as Fibber McGee and Molly in 1935 when Johnson’s Wax signed on as sponsor.

5:30 am – 6:00 am Charlie McCarthy Show
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"Highlights From Bergen's Career" from 6/11/1953 Ventriloquist Edgar Bergen developed his Charlie McCarthy character in high school. Bergen performed with the newsboy dummy while attending Northwestern University and eventually left college to tour vaudeville. With the decline of vaudeville during the Great Depression, Bergen moved into night spots like New York’s trendy Rainbow Room but feared his friend wouldn’t be appreciated by high society. So he gave Charlie a monocle and top hat and a "man about town" was born. Following a three-month guest stint on Rudy Vallee’s show, Edgar Bergen was signed as headliner of The Chase and Sanborn Hour. The series premiered May 9, 1937 and ended the next three seasons as radio’s top-rated series.

6:00 am – 7:00 am Lux Radio Theatre
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"Alibi Ike" from 4/19/1937 The Lux Radio Theatre was one of radio's most popular series attracting Hollywood's top stars and boasting a lavish budget. The Lux Radio Theatre began in 1934 featuring dramas from Broadway, but there was not enough material to support the show. In an attempt to reverse the slipping ratings, the show was moved to Hollywood in 1936, where there was plenty of material and talent.

7:00 am – 7:30 am Yours Truly, Johnny Dollar
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"Virginia Beach Matter" from 8/31/1950 Yours Truly, Johnny Dollar told the story of the freelance insurance investigator with the "action-packed expense account." Radio’s last great detective series, Yours Truly, Johnny Dollar ended its run September 30, 1962 during the final week of network radio drama.

7:30 am – 8:00 am Gunsmoke
close Gunsmoke

"Letter Of The Law" from 7/15/1956 Radio’s greatest adult western told the story of Matt Dillon, U.S. Marshal, "the first man they look for and the last they want to meet." Gunsmoke grew out of a request from CBS founder William Paley for a "Philip Marlowe in the Old West," and featured grimly realistic stories set in the vicinity of Dodge City, the "Gommorrah of the West," with William Conrad as Dillon.

8:00 am – 9:00 am Lux Radio Theatre
close Lux Radio Theatre

"The Show-Off" from 2/1/1943 The Lux Radio Theatre was one of radio's most popular series attracting Hollywood's top stars and boasting a lavish budget. The Lux Radio Theatre began in 1934 featuring dramas from Broadway, but there was not enough material to support the show. In an attempt to reverse the slipping ratings, the show was moved to Hollywood in 1936, where there was plenty of material and talent.

9:00 am – 9:30 am Great Gildersleeve
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"Arrives In Summerfield (Premiere)" from 8/31/1941 The Great Gildersleeve featured one of radio’s greatest casts of comedic players. The Great Gildersleeve aired until March 21, 1957, with Willard Waterman taking over the title role for the final seven radio season and three television seasons.

9:30 am – 10:00 am Fibber McGee & Molly
close Fibber McGee & Molly

"Five Tons Of Coal" from 12/3/1940 The husband-and-wife vaudeville team of Jim and Marian Jordan began their radio careers in Peoria on a bet from Jim’s brother. The Jordans were heard as The O’Henry Twins and The Air Scouts before Don Quinn created Smackout in 1931. Quinn revamped the show as Fibber McGee and Molly in 1935 when Johnson’s Wax signed on as sponsor.

10:00 am – 10:30 am The Line-Up
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"The Holstedter Case" from 12/21/1950 This CBS cop procedural pulls back the curtain on crime fighting in San Francisco. The Shadow's Bill Johnstone starred as cool-mannered Lt. Ben Guthrie, foil to hot-tempered Sgt. Matt Grebb. Director Elliot Lewis was one of the busiest men in radio, having a hand in the Phil Harris & Alice Faye Show, Suspense, Broadway Is My Beat, and many more.

10:30 am – 11:00 am Richard Diamond, Private Detective
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"The Carnival" from 3/30/1951 Richard Diamond, Private Detective premiered over the NBC network on April 24, 1949 and ran through 1952 starring Dick Powell as "radio's singing detective." Powell had first achieved movie stardom as a baby-faced crooner, and later matured to hardboiled roles, including Raymond Chandler's Philip Marlowe in the 1944 film Murder My Sweet.

11:00 am – 11:30 am Alan Young Show
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"Smashed Fender" from 2/8/1946 This sitcom aired from 1944-1949, first as a summer replacement series for Eddie Cantor's show. Then, after signing on as a regular on the Jimmy Durante show, young scored his own show with Tums as a sponsor. Today he is best known as TV's Wilbur Post, who talked with Mr. Ed the horse.

11:30 am – 12:00 pm Great Gildersleeve
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"Gildy Picks Husband For Marjorie" from 5/6/1945 The Great Gildersleeve featured one of radio’s greatest casts of comedic players. The Great Gildersleeve aired until March 21, 1957, with Willard Waterman taking over the title role for the final seven radio season and three television seasons.

12:00 pm – 1:00 pm When Radio Was
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Radio Spirits' nationally syndicated radio program hosted by old-time radio expert Greg Bell

1:00 pm – 1:30 pm Dimension X
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"Universe" from 8/2/1951 Dimension X aired over NBC from April 8, 1950 through September 29, 1951 featuring "adventures in time and space told in future tense." The series adapted stories by the modern masters of science fiction adapting works by Isaac Asimov, Ray Bradbury, Robert Heinlein, Clifford Simak, Theodore Sturgeon and many others.

1:30 pm – 2:00 pm Escape - Radio Classics
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"Young Man With Cream Tarts" 11/12/1947 Radio's greatest series of high adventure debuted over the CBS network on July 7,1947. Escape's protagonists faced life-and-death situations each week, as the show careened from classic adventure to Western drama to science fiction. The program was broadcast as a sustainer (unsponsored) series during most of its seven-year run.

2:00 pm – 3:00 pm CBS Radio Workshop
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"Brave New World" from 1/27/1956 The CBS Radio Workshop aired from January 27, 1956 through September 22, 1957 and was a revival of the prestigious Columbia Workshop from the 1930s and 1940s. The CBS Workshop regularly featured the works of the world’s greatest writers. including Ray Bradbury, Archibald MacLeish, William Saroyan, Lord Dunsany and Ambrose Bierce.

3:00 pm – 3:30 pm Columbia Workshop
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"Brucie & Willie" from 10/12/1946 Also known as the CBS Radio Workshop, this was an experimental anthology series that pushed the envelope of defining art with its creative use of sound. It featured many New York actors and scripts by some of the country's best writers. It aired in various forms on CBS from 1936 - 1957

3:30 pm – 4:00 pm Police Headquarters
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"Boxing Match Death" from 1932 This police procedural series was syndicated on NBC stations in 1932. It features quarter-hour stories typically based on true crimes.

4:00 pm – 5:00 pm The Shadow
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"The Phantom Fingerprints" from 10/29/1939 --- "Dream Of Death" from 11/9/1947 The Shadow debuted July 31, 1930 as the sinister narrator of CBS’ Street & Smith’s Detective Story Hour. The popularity of the phantom host led the nation’s largest publisher of pulp fiction to launch a mystery magazine devoted to The Shadow’s adventures.

5:00 pm – 5:30 pm The Weird Circle
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"The Rope Of Hair" from 4/16/1944 This horror series consisted mostly of adapted supernatural tales from greats like Edgar Allen Poe and Robert Louis Stevenson. It aired for two seasons from 1943-1945, first on Mutual and then on NBC's Red network.

5:30 pm – 6:00 pm The Falcon
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"The Broken Key" from 7/24/1952 Michael Waring was a freelance detective who was also known as the Falcon. Waring's detective techniques were a cross between Ellery Queen and Richard Diamond. He had a certain eye for detail but was frequently on the outs with the police.

6:00 pm – 6:30 pm Further Adventures of Sherlock Holmes
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"The Godolphin Arabian" from 11/23/2003 Jim French wrote this modern adaptation of mystery's most famous detective as part of the Imagination Theatre productions. These plays were produced and aired in the '00s. John Patrick Lowrie plays Holmes and Lawrence Albert portrays Watson.

6:30 pm – 7:00 pm Adventures of Frank Race
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"The Gold Worshiper" from 3/24/1945 Frank Race is an attorney whose life is filled with intrigue following the war. The adventure series aired from 1949 to 1950. Starring Tom Collins and then Paul Dobov.

7:00 pm – 7:30 pm The Six Shooter
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"Battle At Tower Rock" from 2/21/1954 The Six Shooter aired started movie star James Stewart rode the radio range from September 20, 1953 through June 24, 1954 as Britt Ponset, "the Texas plainsman who wandered through the western territories, leaving behind a trail of still-remembered legends."

7:30 pm – 8:00 pm Gunsmoke
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"Long As I Live" from 12/8/1957 Radio’s greatest adult western told the story of Matt Dillon, U.S. Marshal, "the first man they look for and the last they want to meet." Gunsmoke grew out of a request from CBS founder William Paley for a "Philip Marlowe in the Old West," and featured grimly realistic stories set in the vicinity of Dodge City, the "Gommorrah of the West," with William Conrad as Dillon.

8:00 pm – 9:00 pm Philo Vance, Detective
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"Alibi Murder Case" from 6/6/1950 ---- "One Cent Murder Case" from 7/12/1950 Philo Vance was the most popular fictional detective during the late 1920s and early 1930s and influenced the creation of many later detectives. S.S. Van Dine's legendary creation was first brought to radio on July 5, 1945 in an NBC summer series starring Jose Ferrar and was also briefly portrayed by John Emery.

9:00 pm – 9:30 pm Suspense
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"Hide and Seek" from 5/13/1962 Suspense debuted on June 17, 1942 as a sustaining summer replacement, returned that fall and continued in the CBS lineup until September 30, 1962. "Radio's outstanding theatre of thrills" is recognized as one of the finest dramatic series in the history of broadcasting.

9:30 pm – 10:00 pm The Shadow
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"Death To The Shadow" from 3/12/1944 The Shadow debuted July 31, 1930 as the sinister narrator of CBS’ Street & Smith’s Detective Story Hour. The popularity of the phantom host led the nation’s largest publisher of pulp fiction to launch a mystery magazine devoted to The Shadow’s adventures.

10:00 pm – 10:30 pm Mail Call
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"State Of Maine Tribute (Fred Allen)" from 8/9/1944

10:30 pm – 11:00 pm Duffy's Tavern
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"George Jessel & Rudy Vallee" from 11/5/1947 Millions of radio listeners visited Duffy's Tavern each week, but Duffy himself was nowhere to be found. Although he dutifully phoned Archie the manager each week, he never once dropped by. Duffy's Tavern first opened its doors to radio listeners on the CBS audition series Forecast on July 29, 1940, and then opened for regular business on March 1, 1941.

11:00 pm – 11:40 pm The Bickersons
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"Blanche Has A Stomach Ache" from 3/2/1947

11:40 pm – Friday Midnight Vic & Sade
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"Aunt Bess" from 6/15/1944 Vic and Sade aired from June 29, 1932 through December 7, 1945 and was briefly revived in a half-hour sitcom format in 1946. "Radio’s home folks" were featured in slice-of-life situations that painted a rich portrait of small-town life. Starring Art Van Harvey and Bernardine Flynn.



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